Invasive Species Compendium

Detailed coverage of invasive species threatening livelihoods and the environment worldwide

Abstract

Studies on Apanteles flavipes (Cameron), introduced to control Diatraea saccharalis (F.) in Peru.

Abstract

The results are given of laboratory studies in Peru on the biology of Apanteles flavipes (Cam.), which has been introduced and released in the Chicama and Chancay Valleys in the northern part of the country for the control of Diatraea saccharalis (F.) on sugar-cane. Pairing occurred within a few minutes of adult emergence. After a pre-oviposition period lasting less than 1 day, the females sought out holes in sugar-cane made by the borer larvae and on entering them, fed on the host's faeces. If the larva was actively boring, the parasite laid her egg on the last abdominal segments; the eggs were laid on other parts of the host body if these were available. The females laid an average of 133 eggs each. At ambient temperatures (20-28 deg C), the egg and larval stages together lasted 9-13 days, the prepupal stage 4-5 days and the pupal stage 5-8 days. In a second laboratory where the ambient temperature ranged from about 25 to 30 deg C, the corresponding development periods were 8-16, 1 and 5-7 days, respectively. When host larvae parasitised 1-4 days previously by the indigenous parasite Paratheresia claripalpis (Wulp) were parasitised by A. flavipes, the only parasites to emerge were of P. claripalpis. When host larvae parasitised 1-7 days previously by Apanteles were parasitised by Paratheresia, all the Paratheresia parasites were able to complete their development; only 20% were able to do so if the host had been parasitised 8 days earlier by Apanteles, and none was able to do so if the host had been parasitised 9 days earlier. The percentage of Apanteles adults emerging from hosts that had also been parasitised by Paratheresia were 20, 20, 80, 90, 100 and 100 when the second parasitism began 4, 5, 6, 7, 8 and 9 days, respectively, after the first.