Invasive Species Compendium

Detailed coverage of invasive species threatening livelihoods and the environment worldwide

Abstract

Eel culture.

Abstract

A preface notes that the book was the first detailed account of methods of eel culture evolved in Japan in recent decades, and that the book, translated from Japanese by Ichiro Hayashi, was added to and adapted by Dr. Gordon Williamson to a style suitable for English language readers. Short chapters describe the species and world distribution of the genus Anguilla; market demand for eels in Europe; life history of Japanese eel (A. japonica); pond and running-water culture; method and organization of eel culture industry in Japan; choosing site for eel farm; eel farm design and construction; water quality and its control; feeding eels; diseases and parasites, their recognition and treatment; catching, sorting and transporting eels; month by month pond management in Hamanako area of Japan; catching elvers (eels do not breed in captivity); cooking eels; list of requirements for starting an eel farm; list of useful books and magazines many in English; status and organization of aquaculture in Japan; suppliers of feed and equipment in Japan. Tables include those on world production, main eel-eating countries and their preferences, details of the 16 species of Anguilla, stocking rates, pond construction costs, composition of feed, medicines and diseases, mesh size, seasons of elvers' runs in different parts of Europe. The 115 figures, mostly photographs, are an important part of the book. There is the historic photograph of 1909 by Johannes Schmidt showing the metamorphosis of heptocephalus to elver. Often photographs show ponds and equipment, eels with different diseases and catching, storage and transport of live eels, and range in scale from a large group of eel culture ponds in Yoshida District, the most famous eel culture area in Japan, to a London jellied-eel stall. M. Smith