Invasive Species Compendium

Detailed coverage of invasive species threatening livelihoods and the environment worldwide

Abstract

Some changes in generic names of the Japanese Cecidomyiidi (Diptera, Cecidomyiidae, Cecidomyiinae).

Abstract

In the light of recent taxonomic changes affecting generic names, the author draws attention to the correct names for 6 species of gall midges that occur in Japan and gives notes on their world distribution and prey or food-plant species. The gall midges include Diadiplosis hirticornis Felt, which in Japan has been recorded preying on Planococcus citri (Risso), P. kraunhiae (Kuw.), Pseudococcus sp. and P. citriculus Green; Kalodiplosis japonicus (Grover & Prasad), which was formerly placed in the genus Golanudiplosis and in Japan preys on P. comstocki (Kuw.) and Crisicoccus matsumotoi (Shiraiwa); Paradiplosis manii (Inouye), which was formerly placed in the genus Agevillea and is known only from Japan, where the larvae caused basally swollen needle galls on Abies sachalinensis; Resseliella odai (Inouye), which was formerly placed in the genus Thomasiniana and in Japan sometimes markedly reduces the value of the timber of Japanese cedar (Cryptomeria japonica) by the fleck marks produced by the feeding of the larvae on the phloem; and R. soya (Monzen), which was formerly placed in the genus Profeltiella, the larvae causing leaves of soyabean to wither as a result of their feeding in the petioles.