Invasive Species Compendium

Detailed coverage of invasive species threatening livelihoods and the environment worldwide

Abstract

Injurious insects in cargoes from India.

Abstract

During 1967-76, 140 species of insects were detected in 4063 cases of inspection of cargoes of plant materials from India in the port of Odessa (USSR). Some were species against which quarantine regulations are in force to prevent their introduction into the USSR, including Trogoderma granarium Everts, Phthorimaea operculella (Zell.), Callosobruchus chinensis (L.), C. maculatus (F.), Quadraspidiotus perniciosus (Comst.) and Dialeurodes citri (Ashm.). The first of these is a pest of prime importance and was recorded from Indian cargoes of grain 188 times during the past 10 years (mainly 1973-75), this constituting 45% of all records for that period. Most of the records were from cargoes, though a few were from storehouses and ships' holds. Some cross-infestation from other materials is suspected. Methods of inspection for this species are described. When all materials under Indian quarantine arrangements were considered, some 40 species of insects absent from the USSR were recorded in over 2000 reports. Among the 12 most frequently encountered species were Corcyra cephalonica (Stnt.) in groundnuts and other materials, Carpophilus obsoletus on onions, especially those of poor quality, C. dimidiatus (F.) and C. niger Erichs. (Say) which occurred in some cargoes, Callosobruchus analis (F.) and Zabrotes subfasciatus (Boh.), which occurred on caroges of leguminous seeds, Caryedon serratus (Ol.), the groundnut bruchid, which was recorded on 2 occasions (and may present a case of importance for the USSR) and Attagenus fasciatus (Thnb.). Over 17 species were intercepted in timber, including bamboo, and the names of the most important are recorded. Infestation of timber decreased in 1976. Various coccids infesting fruit trees are also of importance and are listed. Numerous insects of no quarantine importance were recorded, including 100 species of beetles and Lepidoptera of 19 families, many being pests of stored products. It is concluded from these results that imports from India still require careful inspection so as to prevent the introduction of important pests.