Invasive Species Compendium

Detailed coverage of invasive species threatening livelihoods and the environment worldwide

Abstract

Evaluation of postharvest handling methods for transcontinental truck shipments of cut carnations, chrysanthemums, and roses.

Abstract

The longevity and quality of flowers experimentally shipped from California to Maryland by refrigerated trucks for 4-5 days were comparable with or better than simulated air-shipped flowers, when properly handled. Flowers shipped by air are usually not refrigerated in transit. The best results with White Sim carnations, Albatross standard chrysanthemums and Cara Mia roses were obtained when flowers were pretreated after harvest by dipping in 50 p.p.m. AgNO3 and pulsing in 10% sucrose + 150 p.p.m. citric acid solution for 16 h, precooled prior to shipment and shipped in insulated boxes. Preshipment pulsing of carnations and chrysanthemums increased longevity and bloom diameter. Pulsing of Cara Mia roses extended longevity and prevented bent-neck. Chrysanthemums and roses benefited from ice in the box even with good refrigeration, but not carnations. Carnations and chrysanthemums cut at a tight bud stage suffered much less than open blooms from heat stress conditions during flower handling.