Invasive Species Compendium

Detailed coverage of invasive species threatening livelihoods and the environment worldwide

Abstract

Insect-trapping hairs on potato plants.

Abstract

The capacity of glandular hairs on the foliage of the wild potato species Solanum polyadenium and S. berthaultii for trapping mites (Tetranychus urticae Koch) and insect pests (including Myzus persicae (Sulz.), Macrosiphum euphorbiae (Thos.), Leptinotarsa decemlineata (Say), Javesella pellucida (F.), Thrips tabaci Lind. and Planococcus citri (Risso)) is illustrated by scanning electron micrographs. Both plant species have hairs with 4-lobed heads that release a sticky substance when ruptured. On S. polyadenium these hairs trapped aphids, larvae of L. decemlineata and adults of J. pellucida. S. berthaultii also had hairs with a sticky droplet at their tips that trapped spider mites, thrips and larval mealybugs. Adults of Trialeurodes vaporariorum (Westw.) were not trapped because a powdery wax from the whiteflies coated the hairs. It is suggested that these glandular hairs could help protect potato crops by trapping many foliage pests, including vectors of disease.<new para>ADDITIONAL ABSTRACT:<new para>The ability of glandular hairs on the foliage of the wild potato species Solanum polyadenium and S. berthaultii to trap mite and insect pests is illustrated by scanning electron micrographs. Both potato species have hairs with 4 lobed heads which release a sticky substance when ruptured. On S. polyadenium these hairs trapped aphids, Colorado beetle larvae and a leafhopper Javesella pellucida. S. berthaultii also has hairs with a sticky droplet at their tips; these hairs trapped such small pests as spider mites, thrips and larval mealybugs. Adult whitefly were not trapped because a powdery wax from the whiteflies coated the hairs. It is suggested that these glandular hairs could help protect potato crops by trapping many foliage pests, including disease vectors.<new para>ADDITIONAL ABSTRACT:<new para>After a description of the piliferous leaf character of Solanum berthaultii and S. polyadenium the potential value of introducing the character into S. tuberosum with a view to breeding for insect resistance is briefly discussed.