Invasive Species Compendium

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Abstract

The association of the mite Brevipalpus phoenicis (Geijskes) with coffee ringspot.

Abstract

Mites collected near Taubate in the Brazilian State of Sao Paulo in December 1972 from leaves of coffee showing symptoms of coffee ringspot (CR) were subsequently identified as Brevipalpus phoenicis (Geijskes). When mites from the same source were confined on healthy coffee seedlings in the greenhouse, three of the 10 test plants showed chlorotic spots 30-40 days after being infested and typical ringspot lesions developed within 60 days. Test plants that had not been infested remained healthy. In a similar test in June 1973, four out of five test plants showed typical symptoms after being infested with the mites. Bacilliform particles similar to those associated with the virus causing leprosis of Citrus (which is transmitted by B. phoenicis in Brazil [RAE/A 49, P. 116]) have been found in plants with symptoms of CR. It is concluded that the causal agent of CR is probably a virus, and probably one related to the virus causing leprosis; B. phoenicis appears to be the vector.<new para>ADDITIONAL ABSTRACT:<new para>The association of B. phoenicis with coffee ringspot virus was confirmed by infestation trials with the arabica cv. Mundo Novo. It is suggested that B. phoenicis is the vector.<new para>ADDITIONAL ABSTRACT:<new para>Glasshouse experiments suggested that the disease was closely associated with the acarid and probably transmitted by it. The similarity in symptoms, virus particles and vector to citrus leprosis suggest that the pathogens may be related or identical.