Invasive Species Compendium

Detailed coverage of invasive species threatening livelihoods and the environment worldwide

Abstract

Flora Europaea. Vol. 3. Diapensiaceae to Myoporaceae.

Abstract

The first volume of Flora Europaea appeared in 1964 and the second in 1968 [See PBA 35, 1370; 39, 3912]. Since the general character of this major floristic venture has been sufficiently indicated in our earlier reviews, attention will be drawn here to the special or novel features of the present volume. It cover the sympetalous Englerian orders Diapensiales, Ericales, Primulales, Plumbaginales, Ebenales, Oleales, Gentiales and Tubiflorae, except that the Rubiaceae have been deferred till volume 4. The editorial committee responsible for the overall production remains as for the previous volume, but two additional research assistants have collaborated, Mr. I. B. Ferguson and Dr. R. A. DeFilipps. The list of contributors of particular articles has expanded further to just under seventy, an indication of the truly cooperative and international character of the project. The distinction between the basic and standard floras listed after the introduction is now spelled out, the former being widely known regional floras. Four new standard floras are included: Bornmuller's Macedonian flora, Ehrendorf's list of Central European vascular plants, Mullender's Belgian flora, and Soo and Karpati's revision of the Hungarian flora. Users of the Flora Europaea should bear in mind that new names and nomenclatural notes are not included in its text; they are published as a series of Notulae systematicae, those for volumes 1 and 2 of the flora in Feddes Repertorium and for subsequent volumes in the Botanical Journal of the Linnean Society.Of the various critical groups covered in this volume, the species of the genera Melampyrum and Rhinanthus exhibit pseudoseasonal polymorphism. This presents considerable difficulty to the nomenclatural taxonomist, but the useful compromise of listing the basionyms of ecotypic variants without commitment either to their taxonomic status or their genotypic identity has been adopted to apparent good effect. Another critical genus, this time of economic importance, is Mentha, treated by R. M. Harley. Hybridization is rife and vegetative reproduction common. Up to three species may contribute to a single hybrid taxon. The genus Thymus is also of some economic interest.Appendices, index and maps follow the pattern of the earlier volumes. Except for some occasional faltering in orthography and over diacriticals, the printing is a delight to linger over.