Invasive Species Compendium

Detailed coverage of invasive species threatening livelihoods and the environment worldwide

Abstract

Aquaculture. The farming and husbandry of freshwater and marine organisms.

Abstract

This book has as its nucleus a report prepared for the American Institute of Biological Sciences, under contract with the U.S. President's Council on Marine Resources and Engineering Development, but the report has been rewritten and supplemented with much new information. The authors' aim is to review the present situation as revealed in the literature and from information supplied by research workers. The book is confined to a consideration of food species as distinct from ornamental (e.g., pearls) or industrial aquatic resources (e.g., colloids from algae).In 43 chapters the present situation and future prospects for all types of marine and freshwater organisms which could be utilised as food are dealt with from the luxury sources important in the developed areas of the world - oysters, lobsters, trout, salmon and pompano - to those which are plentiful in the developing areas and which hold out hope of easing the world protein shortage - carp, tilapia and other freshwater species, milkfish and mullet. There are chapters devoted also to seaweeds and edible freshwater plants in addition to many invertebrates.Aquaculture, like any other method of food production, is not seen as a panacea for human nutritional problems. Nevertheless under conditions of world protein shortage it is becoming recognised that the potentialities of the oceans, lakes and rivers must be realised, and that the time is ripe for an equivalent amount of endeavour to be given to the problems to that given to improvements in land use. Aquatic crops are capable of extremely high productivity under controlled conditions in certain environments, and furthermore they give high yields of protein compared with land crops which are frequently starchy staples, Some, it is claimed, some, it is claimed, may be better converters of primary protein than ruminants, fowl or pigs and some utilise microscopic plankton which cannot be used directly by man.This book is attractively arranged with numerous photographs and diagrams illustrating aspects of culturing all types of aquatic organisms. References are given at the end of each chapter.A.A. Woodham.<new para>ADDITIONAL ABSTRACT:<new para>This book is a comprehensive review of the farming and husbandry of freshwater and marine animals, including fish, shrimps, lobsters, crayfish, crabs, oysters, clams, cockles, scallops, mussels, abalone and squid, and also seaweed and edible freshwater plants. Chapters are devoted to the culture of each of these groups and particular attention is given to fish farming. The species of fish most commonly farmed are dealt with separately and methods of culture in different countries are described, together with the various problems encountered - including helminths. Although helminthologists hoping for a large section on parasites in fish farms will be disappointed, this book nevertheless is a valuable reference work for those working in this field because it provides a wealth of information on all the methods and problems of aquaculture.