Invasive Species Compendium

Detailed coverage of invasive species threatening livelihoods and the environment worldwide

Abstract

Agromyzidae (Diptera) of economic importance.

Abstract

In this major work on the Agromyzidae of economic importance, the author includes 156 species and brings together much hitherto scattered information on them. Nineteen species are described as new, one new genus is erected and numerous changes in nomenclature are made. The new genus is Tropicomyia (type species Melanagromyza flacourtiae Seguy), and it is erected for a group of small leaf-miners occurring in the Old World tropics and extending to Australia and southern Japan formerly included in Melanagromyza. Species of major importance transferred to it include M. coffeae (Kon.) from Java and M. theae (Cotes) from Ceylon (which is distinct from the species on tea in northern India and Japan, now identified as T. atomella (Mall). Other taxonomic changes include the transfer of M. phaseoli (Tryon) to Ophiomyia. Liriomyza langei Frick and L. dianthi Frick are synonyms of L. huidobrensis (Blanch.), and L. pullata Frick, L. minutiseta Frick, L. munda Frick and L. guytona Freeman are synonyms of L. sativae Blanch.The book is divided into 13 chapters. The first is introductory and includes information on natural control by parasites, susceptibility or otherwise to insecticides, types of damage, distribution, and systematics, with a key to the genera in which species of economic importance are found. The second chapter is concerned with distribution, evolution and host specificity and includes a list of the Agromyzids considered, showing their food-plants, the plant part attacked and the geographical areas of occurrence and also a list of food-plants showing the species that attack them. Later chapters deal with the Agromyzids that attack leguminous and miscellaneous crops as internal feeders or as leaf-miners, the species of the new genus Tropicomyia, polyphagous species of Liriomyza and Phytomyza, leaf-miners on cereals and other graminaceous crops, stem borers, gall-causers and leaf-miners on trees, internal feeders and leaf-miners on ornamental plants, control measures, and beneficial species (feeding on weeds). There are two appendices, one on a visit to Venezuela in 1972 and the other comprising a list of new taxa, new synonyms and new combinations. The information given on individual species relates in the main to their morphology (including the male genitalia), food-plants, biology, injuriousness, distribution and parasites, but other topics are sometimes introduced into the discussions that follow. Keys are included where necessary. There is a general index arranged alphabetically and an index to parasites arranged under their families and genera.