Invasive Species Compendium

Detailed coverage of invasive species threatening livelihoods and the environment worldwide

Abstract

Flora Europaea. Vol. 2. Rosaceae to Umbelliferae.

Abstract

Vol. 1 of what can legitimately be considered as the major flora of the post-War period appeared in 1964 [cf. XXXV, 1370] and its general characteristics were enthusiastically described in our earlier review. Vol. 2 covers the Englerian orders Rosales (final section), Geraniales, Rutales, Sapin-dales, Celastrales, Rhamnales, Málvales, Thymelaeales, Guttiferales, Viólales, Cucurbitales, Cactales, Myrtales and Umbelliflorae. Vol. 1 was based on the eleventh edition of Engler's Syllabus. The twelfth edition appeared in 1964 and the present volume is based on this. This involves a slight disparity since the Cactales 'and Guttiferales would have found their place in Vol. 1 had the twelfth edition of the Syllabus appeared earlier.
The editorial committee has been augmented by the addition of D. M. Moore, and I. K. Ferguson has been appointed as an additional research assistant. Amongst the advisory editors, A. A. Federov replaces B. K. Siskin, representing the USSR. It is gratifying to learn of the financial support for this botanical venture from such general scientific bodies as the Royal Society, London, and the Spanish Higher Council for Scientific Research. The list of standard floras cited after the introduction and forming the source for the synonymy has been somewhat extended.
Again, the value of Flora Europaea for plant breeders is mainly indirect but a number of genera whose wild species are of significance in economic crop breeding are covered. These include Rubus, where the agamospecies are reduced to some kind of order by clustering around a circle species which is alone keyed and described, and also Prunus, Vicia, Melilotus, Medicago, Trifolium and Lotus. As before, incidental allusion is made to cultivated species, including a rather perfunctory account oí Citrus. The implication that all the forms of Cucúrbita pepo grown as vegetables are vegetable marrows is a little misleading.
The publication of the Flora Europaea is a timely reminder that the cultural unity of Europe is not wholly lost. The flora should be accessible to anyone whose thinking transcends national boundaries.