Invasive Species Compendium

Detailed coverage of invasive species threatening livelihoods and the environment worldwide

Abstract

A canker and wilt disease of Pimento (Pimenta officinalis) caused by Ceratocystis fimbriata in Jamaica.

Abstract

The disease [cf. 43, 351] generally attacks mature trees, usually starting in 1 limb and spreading over a period of years, though individual limbs may be killed in 3 months. Initial infection is by a wound, generally due to fracture at harvest or a bark abrasion. Such wounds normally callus over, but infection by C. fimbriata [cf. 44, 1353d] (the pathogenicity of which was proved) is followed by a typical elliptical canker, spread from which, under the bark, may be observed before leaf symptoms appear. Infection of diseased tissue by other fungi, notably Valsa eugeniae and Phomopsis sp., follows.
The isolate of C. fimbriata from pimento was non-pathogenic to cacao, coffee, and sweet potato. The slow spread of the pathogen and the absence of insect vectors make possible complete control by pruning and phytosanitation.