Invasive Species Compendium

Detailed coverage of invasive species threatening livelihoods and the environment worldwide

Abstract

Taxonomic studies on soy bean leaf and stem mining flies (Diptera, Agromyzidae) of economic importance in Japan, with descriptions of three new species.

Abstract

The author reports that Melanagromyza phaseoli[Ophiomyia phaseoli] (Tryon), which is widely distributed in the Far East, Africa and Australia, was found causing severe damage to beans (Phaseolus vulgaris) on the island of Okinawa, Japan, and describes the third-instar larvae, puparia and adults of this Agromyzid and of M. sojae (Zhnt.) and three new species, M. shibatsujii, M. koizumii and Japanagromyza nawai, all of which attack soyabean in other parts of the country. M. shibatsujii, which closely resembles M. phaseoli, is the most destructive, is widely distributed on the three main islands and causes severe damage to young plants. The adults are present throughout June and oviposit in the stem at about ground-level, and the larvae bore down into the roots, where they pupate; there is one generation a year, and the winter is spent in the pupal stage. M. sojae is particularly important in southwestern Japan, develops in the stems and has at least four generations between June and October. M. koizumii has at least two generations a year and damages the leaf stalks or the tips of the shoots between midsummer and mid-October, and J. nawai probably has several generations a year, the larvae mining in the leaves between May and September; these two species are less important, but sometimes cause severe local damage.