Invasive Species Compendium

Detailed coverage of invasive species threatening livelihoods and the environment worldwide

Abstract

Host range, symptomatology, physical properties, and cross-protection studies of Orchid virus isolates. Serological and morphological relationships among Orchid viruses.

Abstract

The results are described from the University of Hawaii, Honolulu, of the effects produced on 8 genera of orchids and on Datura stramonium by abrasive inoculation with Cattleya necrosis virus (CNV) [35, p. 17], Cymbidium mosaic virus (CMV) [loc. cit. ; cf. 35, p. 370], Cattleya colour-break virus (CBV) [cf. 36, p. 323], Dendrobium mosaic virus (HMV) [33, p. 605], Spathoglottis diamond spot virus (SDV) [loc. cit.], and Vanda mosaic virus (VMV) [loc. cit.]. Inoculation of 23 genera outside Orchidaceae produced no symptoms, but re-inoculation to Spathoglottis plicata from cucumber, nasturtium, zinnia, passion fruit, and rice induced symptoms.
The similarity of the symptoms produced on most of the hosts and cross protection studies indicated CMV to be present in all the isolates, CNV and SDV isolates to be strains of [orchid] (Cymbidium) mosaic virus and the other 3 apparently to be mixtures of CMV and another virus.
In the second paper serological studies, together with electronmicroscope studies at the University of California, Berkeley, are described which showed HMV also to be a strain of CMV, whereas in the CBV isolate, CMV was associated with [orchid] (Odontoglossum) ring spot virus, previously known only in California [32, p. 129], and in the VMV isolate with a new virus having rods 80 x 13 µ, for which no selective host could be found.