Invasive Species Compendium

Detailed coverage of invasive species threatening livelihoods and the environment worldwide

Abstract

A Review of British Glasshouse Thysanoptera.

Abstract

This summary of information on Thysanoptera in glasshouses in Britain, which is based on the literature and the author's own observations, contains general accounts of collection and preservation methods and the life-cycle, bionomics, behaviour and natural enemies of thrips, detailed reviews of the 13 native and 13 introduced species already present in glasshouses, together with briefer accounts of seven native and some 11 foreign species regarded as of potential importance, and a key to the females and, in most instances, the males of the 29 genera concerned. The aspects dealt with for the individual species include morphology, synonymy, world distribution in the open and under glass, distribution in Britain, food-plants, seasonal occurrence, bionomics, nature and importance of the damage caused, status as vectors of virus diseases (if any), natural enemies, and control. Thrips tabaci Lind. [cf. R.A.E., A 20 483; 22 481; 24 556; 28 135; 29 146] is the commonest of the four native species of more than casual occurrence in glasshouses; the others are Taeniothrips atratus (Hal.) [cf. 40 362], which damages carnations and other flowers under glass and appears to be most numerous in north-eastern Scotland, Thrips fitscipennis Hal. [cf. 20 483; 24 557; 28 133; 29 146], which is recorded damaging the leaves of peach in glasshouses in north-eastern Scotland [cf. also 31 178], and T. major Uzel [cf. 21 487-488; 22 232], which on rare occasions damages flowers in late summer, and all are polyphagous. Heliothrips haemorrhoidalis (Bch.) is the most widespread and injurious of the introduced species, of which others of importance include the Gladiolus thrips, Taeniothrips simplex[Thrips simplex] (Morison) [cf. 40 224, 362] and Liothrips vaneeckei Priesn. [cf. 23 222; 24 107], which injures lily bulbs in glasshouses and in the open.