Invasive Species Compendium

Detailed coverage of invasive species threatening livelihoods and the environment worldwide

Abstract

Tests on the adaptability of trees and shrubs to shelterbelt planting on certain Phymatotrichum root rot infested soils of Oklahoma and Texas.

Abstract

Six years of study on a number of soil types showed that only a few of the tree and shrub species used were markedly resistant to root rot and none were immune. Most resistant were Celtis occidentalis, Sapindus drummondii, Chilopsis linearis, Juniperus virginiana, and J. scopulorum; Ailanthus altissima was some-what less resistant. The following species were highly susceptible and should not be planted on infected soils: -Ulmus americana, U. pumila, Gleditsia triacanthos, Gymnocladus dioicus, Maclura pomifera, Elaeagnus angustifolia, and Populus sargentii. Shelterbelts on freely permeable sandy soils lost much less to root rot than similar nearby plantations on less permeable soils: - Indications were that use of a chequer Ward or alternate arrangement of planting, rather than rows all of one species, might still further reduce losses from root rot even for resistant species. From authors' summary. KEYWORDS: Ailanthus altissima A. glandulosa \ Celtis occidentalis \ Chilopsis linearis \ Elaeagnus angustifolia \ fungal diseases \ Glcditsia triacanthos root rot \ Gymnocladus dioicus \ Juniperus scopulorum \ Juniperus virginiana resistant \ root rot \ Maclura pomifera \ Populus sargentii \ Root disease \ Sa