Invasive Species Compendium

Detailed coverage of invasive species threatening livelihoods and the environment worldwide

Abstract

The indigenous trees of Uganda.

Abstract

All workers on the trees of Uganda will welcome this published form of a thesis for the degree of Ph.D. Edinburgh. Though it appears in the form of a flora, with keys to families, genera and species, descriptions, and a wealth of clear photographs and line drawings, it is more of a personal product than a compilation of all existing literature. Mr. Eggeling quotes for preference his own specimens where available, and his own notes in most cases. Even where he has none of his own records to quote, he is able to draw upon the field notes of observers who have experience of the trees as living ecological and forest entities. Much useful information on the properties of the woods is also included. Since most of the work was prepared in Uganda, far from large libraries and herbaria, no attempt has been made to include all available literature and citations. Some omissions and errors are inevitable in these circumstances, but the main purpose of the book, as a handbook for the forester, is not necessarily greatly interfered with on that account. An alphabetical order of families and genera was chosen, probably because the basis of operations was the alphabetical Uganda Check List. This is perhaps unfortunate, because the order proposed by Hutchinson is used both in the Uganda Herbaria and in the Herbarium at the Imperial Forestry Institute, where the foresters who will use the book are generally trained. Thus the desired object of ease of reference does not seem to have been quite attained by an alphabetical arrangement. These superficial criticisms do not detract seriously from the fact that both author and printer have produced between them a very useful and elegant work. It has already proved useful at the Imperial Forestry Institute, and may be commended to the attention of everyone with an interest in Tropical African trees. If the writer did not know Mr. Eggeling, he would find difficulty in believing that the latter had only been some eight years in Uganda before publishing his thesis. KEYWORDS: Uganda indigenous trees \ Uganda