Invasive Species Compendium

Detailed coverage of invasive species threatening livelihoods and the environment worldwide

Abstract

Fusarium monograph. Parasitic and saprophytic fungi.

Abstract

The author here presents the results of his extensive field and laboratory investigations (the latter comprising pure culture experiments and the examination of exsiccata) of 64 species, 79 varieties, and 38 forms of the form genus Fusarium, classified in 16 groups and 9 subgroups. These are furnished with keys in Latin, and Latin diagnoses are also given of the different species, together with notes on their occurrence and distribution, a critical examination of previous descriptions, and exact dimensional data based on personal study. Diagnoses of the perfect stages already known of 12 out of the 16 groups, belonging to the genera Nectria, Gibberella, Calonectria, and Hypomyces, are appended to the descriptions of the corresponding Fusarium stages for comparative purposes [cf. R.A.M., v, p. 700]. The present section of the monograph comprises only 10 out of the 16 groups, viz., Eupionnotes, Spicarioides, Arachnites, Arthrosporiella, Gribbosum, Discolor, Lateritium, Liseola, Elegans, and Ventricosum, the remaining 6, namely, Macroconia, Submicrocera, Pseudomicrocera, Sporotrichiella, Roseum, and Martiella, being reserved for future discussion.
Numerous species formerly considered to belong to Fusarium have been excluded from this genus as a result of the author's studies. The scope of the work has therefore been extended to cover other genera of the Fungi Imperfecti and related Hypocreaceae. Certain fungi having no Fusarium stage, e.g. Melanospora sp. and N. cinnabarina, as well as Neocosmospora, in which this stage is rudimentary, are also included as an indication of the limits of Fusarium [cf. ibid., ix, p. 736].
F. oxysporum is considered to include a group of forms, two of which are represented by the banana wilt-producing fungi commonly known as F. cubense and F. cubense var. inodoratum [cf. ibid., v, p. 766]. Paeudonectria musae Hochapfel was found in decaying banana fruits from America in association with F. moniliforme var. minus. Cylindrocarpon bulborum n. sp. was obtained on narcissus bulbs in Great Britain and C. curvatum Hochapfel, on rotted apples in Germany and on wheat in Denmark. Notes are given on a number of other new species, on 15 new varieties, 7 new forms, and 8 new combinations and specific names, while proposals are made for 28 new combinations of varieties and 25 new combinations of forms.
In an appendix some critical observations are made on F. celosiae on Celosia cristata in Japan [ibid., viii, p. 245], for which the new combination Gibberella fujikuroi (Saw.) Wr. is proposed; F. oxysporum var. gladioli [ibid., viii, .p. 382]; and F. oxysporum var. medicaginis [ibid., ix. p. 188].