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Forest Science Database

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Abstract

Botanical classification of the genus Populus, and distributions and descriptions for some 32 species comprising the genus, are given. Hybrids and cultivars of relevance to the UK are described. Silvicultural aspects, with particular reference to Britain and Europe, include: Choice of site; Plant...

Author(s)
Jobling, J.
Publisher
UK
Citation
Forestry Commission Bulletin, 1990, No. 92, pp viii + 84 pp.
Abstract

First published as 'Poplar Planting' (1948), revised in 1956, and now largely re-written. [Cf. F.A. 18 No. 1436. KEYWORDS: Populus \ silviculture \ poplars \ Populus \ hybrids \ commercial hybrids \ plantation establishment \ Silviculture

Author(s)
Jobling, J.
Citation
Leaflet of the Forestry Commission, 1963, No. 27 (rev.), pp 26 pp.
Abstract

Vernier bands were fixed to 5-year-old Populus X robusta pruned to (a) 1/4, (b) 1/2, and (c) 3/4 of total height. Girth increment proceeded steadily throughout the growing season in (a), was slow for several weeks after pruning in (b), and was normal only for a short period in mid-season in (c)....

Author(s)
Jobling, J.
Citation
Report on Forest Research, London, 1962-63, 1964, pp 43-4
Abstract

Briefly reviews Forestry Commission experiments which indicate that hybrid Black Poplars planted in holes made by explosive cartridges grow more vigorously (for the first 4 years at least) than those in normal hand-dug pits. Also discusses the use of very deep or very large planting pits and of...

Author(s)
Jobling, J.
Citation
Quarterly Journal of Forestry, 1961, 55, 4, pp 287-92
Abstract

A series of experiments was started in 1953 to see how far bad handling of Poplar plants contributed to losses after planting. The practical conclusions are that root exposure, up to 40 days in January/ February, does not affect survival after planting, though it may cause some crown dieback and...

Author(s)
Jobling, J.
Citation
Report on Forest Research, London, 1958-59, 1960, pp 161-7
Abstract

Varietal trials of Poplars continue. On the most favourable sites, the most vigourous varieties have reached 50 ft. in height (62 ft. max.) in 8 1/2 years, with girths of ca. 26 in. (29.5 in. max.), and standing volumes of ca. 750 Hoppus ft./acre (18 X 18 ft. spacing). Unfortunately the most...

Author(s)
Jobling, J.
Citation
Report on Forest Research, London, 1958-59, 1960, pp 54-8
Abstract

Work on Poplars was continued and expanded. The benefits of mulching or mounding round plants at the time of planting were confirmed, and good responses were obtained to applications of N fertilizers. Striking improvements in growth and leaf colour resulted from applying lime on acid soils....

Author(s)
Jobling, J.
Citation
Report on Forest Research, London, 1952-53, 1954, pp 49-53