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Abstract

Management of an invasive plant species can be viewed as two separate and successive processes. The first, survey, aims to find infested areas and remove individuals. The second, monitoring, consists of repeated visits to these areas in order to prevent possible re-emergence. As detection...

Author(s)
Bonneau, M.; Hauser, C. E.; Williams, N. S. G.; Cousens, R. D.
Publisher
Springer, Amsterdam, Netherlands
Citation
Biological Invasions, 2018, 20, 3, pp 741-756
Abstract

Ecologists often classify species into binary groupings such as woodland or non-woodland birds. However, each ecologist may apply a different classification, which might impede progress in ecology and conservation by precluding direct comparison between studies. This study describes and tests a...

Author(s)
Fraser, H.; Hauser, C. E.; Rumpff, L.; Garrard, G. E.; McCarthy, M. A.
Publisher
Elsevier Ltd, Oxford, UK
Citation
Biological Conservation, 2017, 214, pp 184-194
Abstract

Aim: Invasive populations are often irregularly distributed due to sporadic dispersal events and patchy distribution of suitable habitat, making it difficult to recognize the population boundary and effectively target management. We designed a survey prioritization that addresses these...

Author(s)
Hauser, C. E.; Giljohann, K. M.; Rigby, M.; Herbert, K.; Curran, I.; Pascoe, C.; Williams, N. S. G.; Cousens, R. D.; Moore, J. L.
Publisher
Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford, UK
Citation
Diversity and Distributions, 2016, 22, 2, pp 136-147
Abstract

A key problem facing invasive species management is how best to allocate surveillance and control effort. Models of the establishment and spread of invasive species are widely used to predict species' occurrence across space and inform resource prioritization. However, the way they should be used...

Author(s)
Giljohann, K. M.; Hauser, C. E.; Williams, N. S. G.; Moore, J. L.
Publisher
Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford, UK
Citation
Journal of Applied Ecology, 2011, 48, 5, pp 1286-1294
Abstract

Recent studies suggest that plant detection is not perfect, even for large, highly visible plants. However, this is often not taken into account during plant surveys where failing to detect a plant when present can result in poor management and biodiversity outcomes. Including knowledge of...

Author(s)
Moore, J. L.; Hauser, C. E.; Bear, J. L.; Williams, N. S. G.; McCarthy, M. A.
Publisher
Ecological Society of America, Washington, USA
Citation
Ecological Applications, 2011, 21, 2, pp 601-607
Abstract

Removing pests from islands, and then keeping them pest free, is a common management goal. Given that goal we face a decision: how much effort should we invest in quarantine to reduce the risk of a pest arriving vs. surveillance, looking for the pest on the island with the view of eradicating it...

Author(s)
Moore, J. L.; Rout, T. M.; Hauser, C. E.; Moro, D.; Jones, M.; Wilcox, C.; Possingham, H. P.
Publisher
Elsevier Ltd, Oxford, UK
Citation
Biological Conservation, 2010, 143, 5, pp 1068-1078
Abstract

Adaptive management has a long history in the natural resource management literature, but despite this, few practitioners have developed adaptive strategies to conserve threatened species. Active adaptive management provides a framework for valuing learning by measuring the degree to which it...

Author(s)
McDonald-Madden, E.; Probert, W. J. M.; Hauser, C. E.; Runge, M. C.; Possingham, H. P.; Jones, M. E.; Moore, J. L.; Rout, T. M.; Vesk, P. A.; Wintle, B. A.
Publisher
Ecological Society of America, Washington, USA
Citation
Ecological Applications, 2010, 20, 5, pp 1476-1489
Abstract

Invasive species surveillance has typically been targeted to where the species is most likely to occur. However, spatially varying environmental characteristics and land uses may affect more than just the probability of occurrence. Biodiversity or economic value, and the ease of detection and...

Author(s)
Hauser, C. E.; McCarthy, M. A.
Publisher
Blackwell Publishing, Oxford, UK
Citation
Ecology Letters, 2009, 12, 7, pp 683-692
Abstract

Active adaptive management (AAM) is an approach to wildlife management that acknowledges our imperfect understanding of natural systems and allows for some resolution of our uncertainty. Such learning may be characterized by risky strategies in the short term. Experimentation is only considered...

Author(s)
Rout, T. M.; Hauser, C. E.; Possingham, H. P.
Publisher
Ecological Society of America, Washington, USA
Citation
Ecological Applications, 2009, 19, 2, pp 515-526

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