Cookies on CAB eBooks

Like most websites we use cookies. This is to ensure that we give you the best experience possible.

 

Continuing to use www.cabi.org  means you agree to our use of cookies. If you would like to, you can learn more about the cookies we use.

CAB eBooks

Ebooks on agriculture and the applied life sciences from CAB International

CABI Book Chapter

The physiology of vegetable crops.

Book cover for The physiology of vegetable crops.

Description

This book on the physiology of vegetable crops focuses on the activities and functions of vegetables, defined as herbaceous plants that are harvested for edible parts that can be consumed fresh or with little preparation. Physiology deals with the growth and development processes of these plants, and while this book is focused primarily on the organ and whole-plant level, brief mention of cellular...

Metrics

Chapter 18 (Page no: 421)

Allium crops.

The genus Allium includes approximately 750-800 species of geophytes with bulbs or rhizomes. Many Allium species were domesticated millennia ago as important foods, and today >20 species, characterized by onion-garlic-like flavor due to cysteine sulfoxides, are consumed worldwide as condiments, green vegetables, and nutraceutical foods. This chapter describes the (i) centers of origin and evolution; (ii) seedling development; (iii) bulbing physiology, including environmental and growth regulators controlling bulbing; plant factors influencing bulb yields; bulb maturation, dormancy, rest, and sprouting; effect of plant growth regulators on storage; genetic control and molecular biology; male sterility; fertilization and seed development; and (iv) physiological disorders of Allium. All studied Allium species exhibit strong interactions between genotypes and environment, which considerably affect growth, foliage development, yield and quality of storage organs, flowering, seed production, and seed quality. Very little is known about the roots and the endogenous mechanism that controls the formation of storage organs. The complex physiology (especially with regard to competition over resources between generative and storage organs) is far from being understood and molecular knowledge is rather poor. Utilization of both classical and novel tools for genetic and physiological studies, and improved knowledge of inherent control mechanisms of the initiation and development of vital processes, will facilitate improvements in terms of distribution, yield, and quality of these important crops, and provide the tools required for cultivation of these cold-requiring plants under the present and future global warming.

Other chapters from this book

Chapter: 1 (Page no: 1) Seed storage, germination, quality, and enhancements. Author(s): Taylor, A. G.
Chapter: 2 (Page no: 31) Transplanting. Author(s): Leskovar, D. I.
Chapter: 3 (Page no: 61) Regulation of flowering in crop plants. Author(s): Wigge, P. A. Jaeger KatjaE.
Chapter: 4 (Page no: 71) Abiotic stress effects on vegetable crops. Author(s): Wien, H. C.
Chapter: 5 (Page no: 94) Models of vegetable growth and development. Author(s): Stützel, H. Chen T. W.
Chapter: 6 (Page no: 117) Correlative growth in vegetable plants. Author(s): Wien, H. C.
Chapter: 7 (Page no: 138) Tomato. Author(s): Heuvelink, E. Okello, R. C. O. Peet, M. Giovannoni, J. J. Dorais, M.
Chapter: 8 (Page no: 179) Peppers. Author(s): Yasuor, H. Wien, H. C.
Chapter: 9 (Page no: 209) Potato. Author(s): Rosen, C. J. Gupta, S. K. Souza, E. F. C.
Chapter: 10 (Page no: 244) The cucurbits. Author(s): Chen, T. W. Stützel, H. Wien, H. C.
Chapter: 11 (Page no: 271) Phaseolus beans. Author(s): Rao, I. M.
Chapter: 12 (Page no: 287) Peas. Author(s): Davies, P. J. Muehlbauer, F. J.
Chapter: 13 (Page no: 317) Sweet corn. Author(s): Tracy, W. F. Shuler, S. Dodson-Swenson, H.
Chapter: 14 (Page no: 333) Lettuce. Author(s): Wien, H. C.
Chapter: 15 (Page no: 357) Cauliflower, broccoli, cabbage, and Brussels sprouts. Author(s): Wien, H. C. Stützel, H.
Chapter: 16 (Page no: 389) Glucosinolates in Brassica. Author(s): Neugart, S. Hanschen, F. S. Schreiner, M.
Chapter: 17 (Page no: 399) The root vegetables: beet, carrot, parsnip, and turnip. Author(s): Goldman, I. L.
Chapter: 19 (Page no: 457) Asparagus. Author(s): Drost, D. T.