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Ebooks on agriculture and the applied life sciences from CAB International

CABI Book Chapter

The physiology of vegetable crops.

Book cover for The physiology of vegetable crops.

Description

This book on the physiology of vegetable crops focuses on the activities and functions of vegetables, defined as herbaceous plants that are harvested for edible parts that can be consumed fresh or with little preparation. Physiology deals with the growth and development processes of these plants, and while this book is focused primarily on the organ and whole-plant level, brief mention of cellular...

Metrics

Chapter 17 (Page no: 399)

The root vegetables: beet, carrot, parsnip, and turnip.

The main aim of this chapter is to identify key physiological factors underlying the initiation and growth of the storage root of beet, carrot, parsnip, and turnip. Additionally, life processes including dormancy, vernalization requirement, flowering, the production of secondary metabolites, and various aspects of growth are examined for each of these crops. Application of molecular biological techniques to horticultural crops has allowed for the identification of a number of genes underlying key plant processes such as root elongation and growth, biosynthesis of secondary metabolites, and flowering. As these crops turned into biennial plants, they adopted traits associated with cultivated crops, including cold hardiness, vernalization requirements, the ability to store for lengthy periods during the postharvest period, increases in sugars and decreases in astringent secondary metabolites, and increases in nutritional value. While these crops do not benefit from an extremely large research community as do other staple crops, significant advances in understanding of their form and function have taken place in the last two decades since the publication of this original volume. Yet much remains to be done.

Other chapters from this book

Chapter: 1 (Page no: 1) Seed storage, germination, quality, and enhancements. Author(s): Taylor, A. G.
Chapter: 2 (Page no: 31) Transplanting. Author(s): Leskovar, D. I.
Chapter: 3 (Page no: 61) Regulation of flowering in crop plants. Author(s): Wigge, P. A. Jaeger KatjaE.
Chapter: 4 (Page no: 71) Abiotic stress effects on vegetable crops. Author(s): Wien, H. C.
Chapter: 5 (Page no: 94) Models of vegetable growth and development. Author(s): Stützel, H. Chen T. W.
Chapter: 6 (Page no: 117) Correlative growth in vegetable plants. Author(s): Wien, H. C.
Chapter: 7 (Page no: 138) Tomato. Author(s): Heuvelink, E. Okello, R. C. O. Peet, M. Giovannoni, J. J. Dorais, M.
Chapter: 8 (Page no: 179) Peppers. Author(s): Yasuor, H. Wien, H. C.
Chapter: 9 (Page no: 209) Potato. Author(s): Rosen, C. J. Gupta, S. K. Souza, E. F. C.
Chapter: 10 (Page no: 244) The cucurbits. Author(s): Chen, T. W. Stützel, H. Wien, H. C.
Chapter: 11 (Page no: 271) Phaseolus beans. Author(s): Rao, I. M.
Chapter: 12 (Page no: 287) Peas. Author(s): Davies, P. J. Muehlbauer, F. J.
Chapter: 13 (Page no: 317) Sweet corn. Author(s): Tracy, W. F. Shuler, S. Dodson-Swenson, H.
Chapter: 14 (Page no: 333) Lettuce. Author(s): Wien, H. C.
Chapter: 15 (Page no: 357) Cauliflower, broccoli, cabbage, and Brussels sprouts. Author(s): Wien, H. C. Stützel, H.
Chapter: 16 (Page no: 389) Glucosinolates in Brassica. Author(s): Neugart, S. Hanschen, F. S. Schreiner, M.
Chapter: 18 (Page no: 421) Allium crops. Author(s): Rabinowitch, H. D. Goldstein, R. K.
Chapter: 19 (Page no: 457) Asparagus. Author(s): Drost, D. T.

Chapter details

  • Author Affiliation
  • University of Wisconsin-Madison, Department of Horticulture, 1575 Linden Drive, Madison, WI 53706, USA.
  • Year of Publication
  • 2020
  • ISBN
  • 9781786393777
  • Record Number
  • 20203203603