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CABI Book Chapter

Livestock handling and transport.

Book cover for Livestock handling and transport.

Description

In this 5th edition of Livestock Handling and Transport the author focused on the effects of biosecurity, genetics, structural designs of areas in the farm and slaughterhouse, proper handling and transport of animals on the welfare, physiology, behaviour, health, and economics of livestock animals. This edition has 473 pages and divided into 23 chapters. Topics of each chapter includes (from chapt...

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Chapter 8 (Page no: 139)

Handling cattle raised in close association with people.

Cattle that are managed in close association with people are tame and may have no flight zone. They are either trained to lead with a lead rope or they are easily herded in small groups. These animals are accustomed to lots of human activity around them. Tame intact bulls that have been kept tied up during rearing will fight vigorously when mixed in group feedlot pens. In Africa and other developing areas, small herds of cattle are kept for draught and milk. There is a concern that the hardy indigenous breeds will be lost. Genomic analysis indicates that they have many valuable traits, such as disease resistance and heat tolerance. There is a need to improve handling practices. Many animals arrive at markets with injuries caused by handlers. Harness design for working oxen also needs to be improved. Injuries to the nose can be prevented by using a halter (head collar) to tie the cattle instead of a nose ring or nose cord. Draught animals would be more physically fit for work if they were exercised year-round. Even though these animals are tame, there is a need for handling facilities, such as truck-loading ramps and a single stall with a head stanchion for veterinary work. This chapter also describes methods for restraining cattle with ropes, blindfolding or pressure applied to various parts of the body. Stroking cattle is most effective for calming cattle when it is done on the ventral region of the neck.

Other chapters from this book

Chapter: 1 (Page no: 1) The importance of stockmanship to maintain high standards of handling and transport of livestock and poultry. Author(s): Grandin, T.
Chapter: 2 (Page no: 12) Welfare of transported animals: welfare assessment and factors affecting welfare. Author(s): Broom, D. M.
Chapter: 3 (Page no: 30) Stress physiology of animals during transport. Author(s): Vogel, K. D. Romans, E. F. I. Obiols, P. L. Velarde, A.
Chapter: 4 (Page no: 58) The effects of both genetics and previous experience on livestock behaviour, handling and temperament. Author(s): Grandin, T.
Chapter: 5 (Page no: 80) Behavioural principles of handling beef cattle and the design of corrals, lairages, races and loading ramps. Author(s): Grandin, T.
Chapter: 6 (Page no: 110) Dairy cattle handling, transport and well-being. Author(s): Baier, F. Fulwider, W. K.
Chapter: 7 (Page no: 126) Robotic milking of dairy cows: behaviour and welfare. Author(s): King, M. DeVries, T. Pajor, E.
Chapter: 9 (Page no: 153) Cattle transport in North America. Author(s): Schwartzkopf-Genswein, K. Grandin, T.
Chapter: 10 (Page no: 184) Handling and transport of cattle and pigs in South America. Author(s): Costa, M. J. R. P. da Huertas, S. M. Gallo, C.
Chapter: 11 (Page no: 206) Behavioural principles of sheep handling. Author(s): Hutson, G. D. Grandin, T.
Chapter: 12 (Page no: 229) Design of sheep yards and shearing sheds. Author(s): Barber, A. Freeman, R. B.
Chapter: 13 (Page no: 239) Sheep transport. Author(s): Cockram, M. S.
Chapter: 14 (Page no: 254) Dogs for herding and guarding livestock. Author(s): Coppinger, L. Coppinger, R.
Chapter: 15 (Page no: 271) Goat handling and transport. Author(s): Miranda-de la Lama, G. C.
Chapter: 16 (Page no: 290) Behavioural principles of pig handling. Author(s): Hemsworth, P. H.
Chapter: 17 (Page no: 307) Transport of pigs. Author(s): Faucitano, L. Lambooij, E.
Chapter: 18 (Page no: 328) Transport of market pigs: improvements in welfare and economics. Author(s): Garcia, A. Johnson, A. K. Ritter, M. J. Calvo-Lorenzo, M. S. McGlone, J. J.
Chapter: 19 (Page no: 347) Handling and transport of horses. Author(s): Houpt, K. A. Wickens, C. L.
Chapter: 20 (Page no: 370) Deer handling and transport. Author(s): Goddard, P.
Chapter: 21 (Page no: 404) Poultry handling and transport. Author(s): Weeks, C. A. Tuyttens, F. A. M. Grandin, T.
Chapter: 22 (Page no: 427) Transport of cattle, sheep and other livestock by sea and air. Author(s): Phillips, C.
Chapter: 23 (Page no: 442) Principles of biosecurity during transport, handling and slaughter of animals. Author(s): Belk, K. E. Weinroth, M. D. Grandin, T.

Chapter details

  • Author Affiliation
  • Universities Federation of Animal Welfare, Shrewsbury, UK.
  • Year of Publication
  • 2019
  • ISBN
  • 9781786399151
  • Record Number
  • 20193452512