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CABI Book Chapter

Livestock handling and transport.

Book cover for Livestock handling and transport.

Description

In this 5th edition of Livestock Handling and Transport the author focused on the effects of biosecurity, genetics, structural designs of areas in the farm and slaughterhouse, proper handling and transport of animals on the welfare, physiology, behaviour, health, and economics of livestock animals. This edition has 473 pages and divided into 23 chapters. Topics of each chapter includes (from chapt...

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Chapter 4 (Page no: 58)

The effects of both genetics and previous experience on livestock behaviour, handling and temperament.

Both genetics and previous experiences with handling will have an effect on the behaviour of cattle, sheep, pigs and other livestock. Cattle that become agitated in squeeze chutes or run out quickly (exit speed) have lower productivity and higher physiological measures of stress. There are significant breed differences. Bos indicus breeds are generally more fearful than Bos taurus English/European cattle. Agitated behaviour is more likely to occur in high fear genetics when the animals are confronted with sudden novelty. Young calves should be gently acclimatized to quiet contact with people and moving calmly through handling facilities. This will help produce calmer adult cattle. Rewarding with feed is strongly recommended when animals are being acclimatized to handling facilities. This is especially important if they are moved through the facility multiple times. Animals have specific sensory-based memories. An animal with flighty genetics that is acclimatized to handling may have a violent reaction when it is suddenly confronted with novelty. Livestock with calmer genetics may have a milder reaction to a sudden novel event. Fearfulness is only one temperament trait. Inherited traits such as guarding the calf or seeking further grazing may be separate traits that are not related to fear. Fear-motivated traits such as exit speed score are not related to calf guarding. The Jaak Panksepp emotional traits of FEAR, RAGE, PANIC, separation distress, SEEK, LUST, NURTURE and PLAY may be useful for sorting out conflicting data from temperament research. The most common mistake is mixing up fear-motivated behaviour and aggression. Genomic analysis of temperament should be conducted on single temperament tests such as exit (flight) speed chute/crush score, or isolation tests. Composite scores of more than one temperament test may result in mixing up emotional systems and confounding genomics tests. There is starting to be some evidence that some British and European Continental genetic lines of cattle may have been over-selected for calmness.

Other chapters from this book

Chapter: 1 (Page no: 1) The importance of stockmanship to maintain high standards of handling and transport of livestock and poultry. Author(s): Grandin, T.
Chapter: 2 (Page no: 12) Welfare of transported animals: welfare assessment and factors affecting welfare. Author(s): Broom, D. M.
Chapter: 3 (Page no: 30) Stress physiology of animals during transport. Author(s): Vogel, K. D. Romans, E. F. I. Obiols, P. L. Velarde, A.
Chapter: 5 (Page no: 80) Behavioural principles of handling beef cattle and the design of corrals, lairages, races and loading ramps. Author(s): Grandin, T.
Chapter: 6 (Page no: 110) Dairy cattle handling, transport and well-being. Author(s): Baier, F. Fulwider, W. K.
Chapter: 7 (Page no: 126) Robotic milking of dairy cows: behaviour and welfare. Author(s): King, M. DeVries, T. Pajor, E.
Chapter: 8 (Page no: 139) Handling cattle raised in close association with people. Author(s): Ewbank, R. Parker, M.
Chapter: 9 (Page no: 153) Cattle transport in North America. Author(s): Schwartzkopf-Genswein, K. Grandin, T.
Chapter: 10 (Page no: 184) Handling and transport of cattle and pigs in South America. Author(s): Costa, M. J. R. P. da Huertas, S. M. Gallo, C.
Chapter: 11 (Page no: 206) Behavioural principles of sheep handling. Author(s): Hutson, G. D. Grandin, T.
Chapter: 12 (Page no: 229) Design of sheep yards and shearing sheds. Author(s): Barber, A. Freeman, R. B.
Chapter: 13 (Page no: 239) Sheep transport. Author(s): Cockram, M. S.
Chapter: 14 (Page no: 254) Dogs for herding and guarding livestock. Author(s): Coppinger, L. Coppinger, R.
Chapter: 15 (Page no: 271) Goat handling and transport. Author(s): Miranda-de la Lama, G. C.
Chapter: 16 (Page no: 290) Behavioural principles of pig handling. Author(s): Hemsworth, P. H.
Chapter: 17 (Page no: 307) Transport of pigs. Author(s): Faucitano, L. Lambooij, E.
Chapter: 18 (Page no: 328) Transport of market pigs: improvements in welfare and economics. Author(s): Garcia, A. Johnson, A. K. Ritter, M. J. Calvo-Lorenzo, M. S. McGlone, J. J.
Chapter: 19 (Page no: 347) Handling and transport of horses. Author(s): Houpt, K. A. Wickens, C. L.
Chapter: 20 (Page no: 370) Deer handling and transport. Author(s): Goddard, P.
Chapter: 21 (Page no: 404) Poultry handling and transport. Author(s): Weeks, C. A. Tuyttens, F. A. M. Grandin, T.
Chapter: 22 (Page no: 427) Transport of cattle, sheep and other livestock by sea and air. Author(s): Phillips, C.
Chapter: 23 (Page no: 442) Principles of biosecurity during transport, handling and slaughter of animals. Author(s): Belk, K. E. Weinroth, M. D. Grandin, T.

Chapter details

  • Author Affiliation
  • Department of Animal Science, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, Colorado, USA.
  • Year of Publication
  • 2019
  • ISBN
  • 9781786399151
  • Record Number
  • 20193452508