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CABI Book Chapter

Lyme disease: an evidence-based approach.

Book cover for Lyme disease: an evidence-based approach.

Description

This second edition provides up-to-date evidence-based research and covers the significant advances in our understanding of the disorders referred to as Lyme disease or Lyme borreliosis. Consisting of 17 chapters, this book explores the causative organism, its requisite ecosystem, disease epidemiology, host-Borrelia interactions, diagnostic testing, clinical manifestations, therapeutic options, th...

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Chapter 4 (Page no: 58)

Diagnostic testing for Lyme disease.

This chapter describes the 2-tiered serological approach for the diagnosis of Lyme disease, and provides guidelines for interpreting the results of this approach, with focus on false negative and false positive results. Other diagnostic approaches, such as polymerase chain reaction and culture methods, are also described. The first tier of the standardized 2-tiered serologic test for B. burgdorferi is a screening test by sensitive enzyme immunoassay (EIA) or immunofluorescence methods. Nowadays typically an EIA, this method examines blood for the presence of class-specific IgM and IgG (together or separately) antibodies. If results fall below the threshold, then the first tier is reported as negative, and the test overall is considered negative with no need to perform immunoblotting. If first-tier testing is judged positive or falls in the equivocal range, testing will proceed to separate IgM and IgG western blots, also termed immunoblots.

Other chapters from this book

Chapter: 1 (Page no: 1) Ticks: the vectors of Lyme disease. Author(s): Smith, R. P.
Chapter: 2 (Page no: 29) Biology of the Lyme disease agents: a selective survey of clinical and epidemiologic relevance. Author(s): Barbour, A. G.
Chapter: 3 (Page no: 45) Borreliella: interactions with the host immune system. Author(s): Sperber, K. Dattwyler, R. J.
Chapter: 5 (Page no: 76) Global epidemiology of Borreliella burgdorferi infections. Author(s): Mead, P. S.
Chapter: 6 (Page no: 93) Antibiotic therapy for infection caused by Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato. Author(s): Wormser, G. P.
Chapter: 7 (Page no: 105) Lyme borreliosis: the European perspective. Author(s): Strle, F. Stanek, G. Strle, K.
Chapter: 8 (Page no: 124) Lyme neuroborreliosis: a European perspective. Author(s): Dersch, R.
Chapter: 9 (Page no: 139) Medically unexplained symptoms and Lyme neuroborreliosis - not the same: a study in an endemic area of Norway. Author(s): Roaldsnes, E. Eikeland, R. Berild, D.
Chapter: 10 (Page no: 142) Erythema migrans. Author(s): Nadelman, R. B. Hu, L.
Chapter: 11 (Page no: 168) Lyme carditis. Author(s): Salik, J. R. Dudzinski, D. M.
Chapter: 12 (Page no: 180) The musculoskeletal manifestations of Lyme disease (infection with Borrelia burgdorferi). Author(s): Sigal, L. H.
Chapter: 13 (Page no: 202) Nervous system involvement. Author(s): Halperin, J. J.
Chapter: 14 (Page no: 216) Lyme disease in children. Author(s): Shapiro, E. D.
Chapter: 15 (Page no: 227) The psychology of 'post-Lyme disease syndrome' and 'not Lyme'. Author(s): Hassett, A. L. Sigal, L. H.
Chapter: 16 (Page no: 247) Chronic Lyme disease. Author(s): Marques, A.
Chapter: 17 (Page no: 262) Lyme disease: the great controversy. Author(s): Halperin, J. J. Baker, P. Wormser, G. P.