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CABI Book Chapter

Livestock production and climate change.

Book cover for Livestock production and climate change.

Description

This 395-paged-book aims to raise awareness among scientists, academics, students, livestock farmers and policy makers of the twin inter-related and inter-dependent complex mechanisms of livestock rearing and climate change. The contents are divided into sections: one on livestock production, one on climate change and one on enteric methane amelioration. In the first section, decisive issues such ...

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Chapter 5 (Page no: 74)

Nutritional strategies for minimizing phosphorus pollution from the livestock industry.

Livestock manure traditionally has been considered and used as a valuable resource by farmers to improve crop production. Livestock manure is rich in nutrients (nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P)) and thus has been land applied to enrich soils. But land application of manure nutrients in excess of crop requirements can lead to saturated soil and loss of nutrients to surface water via runoff. Environmental concerns with P from animal agriculture are significant because livestock manure has always been land applied to meet crops' N requirement, resulting in P application in excess of crops' P requirement. The problem is aggravated with the intensification of livestock production, and now animal agriculture has been identified as a primary source of water quality impairment in many regions. But intensification and continuous advancement of livestock production is required to meet the increasing demand of food supply to feed a growing global population. Therefore, management strategies are needed that will improve livestock production while supporting the environmental and social pillars of sustainability. Nutritional strategies are economically and environ mentally efficient tools to reduce P excretion by livestock. This chapter discusses nutritional strategies including precision feeding, phase feeding and approaches to improve feed P availability.

Other chapters from this book

Chapter: 1 (Page no: 1) Overview. Author(s): Prasad, C. S. Malik, P. K. Bhatta, R.
Chapter: 2 (Page no: 8) Feed resources vis-à-vis livestock and fish productivity in a changing climate. Author(s): Blümmel, M. Haileslassie, A. Herrero, M. Beveridge, M. Phillips, M. Havlik, P.
Chapter: 3 (Page no: 25) Strategies for alleviating abiotic stress in livestock. Author(s): Sejian, V. Iqbal Hyder Malik, P. K. Soren, N. M. Mech, A. Mishra, A. Ravindra, J. P.
Chapter: 4 (Page no: 61) Nitrogen emissions from animal agricultural systems and strategies to protect the environment. Author(s): Kohn, R. A.
Chapter: 6 (Page no: 90) Metagenomic approaches in harnessing gut microbial diversity. Author(s): Thulasi, A. Lyju Jose Chandrasekharaiah, M. Rajendran, D. Prasad, C. S.
Chapter: 7 (Page no: 100) Proteomics in studying the molecular mechanism of fibre degradation. Author(s): Singh, N. K.
Chapter: 8 (Page no: 111) Perspective on livestock-generated GHGs and climate. Author(s): Takahashi, J.
Chapter: 9 (Page no: 125) Carbon footprints of food of animal origin. Author(s): Flachowsky, G.
Chapter: 10 (Page no: 146) Carbon sequestration and animal-agriculture: relevance and strategies to cope with climate change. Author(s): Devendra, C.
Chapter: 11 (Page no: 162) Climate change: impacts on livestock diversity in tropical countries. Author(s): Banik, S. Pankaj, P. K. Naskar, S.
Chapter: 12 (Page no: 183) Climate change: effects on animal reproduction. Author(s): Jyotirmoy Ghosh Dhara, S. K. Malik, P. K.
Chapter: 13 (Page no: 202) Climate change: impact of meat production. Author(s): Musalia, L. M.
Chapter: 14 (Page no: 214) Indigenous livestock resources in a changing climate: Indian perspective. Author(s): Ahlawat, S. P. S. Pushpendra Kumar Kush Shrivastava Sahoo, N. R.
Chapter: 15 (Page no: 229) Enteric methane emission: status, mitigation and future challenges - an Indian perspective. Author(s): Raghavendra Bhatta Malik, P. K. Prasad, C. S.
Chapter: 16 (Page no: 245) Thermodynamic and kinetic control of methane emissions from ruminants. Author(s): Kohn, R. A.
Chapter: 17 (Page no: 263) Ionophores: a tool for improving ruminant production and reducing environmental impact. Author(s): Bell, N. Wickersham, T. Sharma, V. Callaway, T.
Chapter: 18 (Page no: 273) Residual feed intake and breeding approaches for enteric methane mitigation. Author(s): Berry, D. P. Lassen, J. Haas, Y. de
Chapter: 19 (Page no: 292) Acetogenesis as an alternative to methanogenesis in the rumen. Author(s): Gagen, E. J. Denman, S. E. McSweeney, C. S.
Chapter: 20 (Page no: 304) Immunization and tannins in livestock enteric methane amelioration. Author(s): Uyeno, Y.
Chapter: 21 (Page no: 318) Phage therapy in livestock methane amelioration. Author(s): Gilbert, R. A. Ouwerkerk, D. Klieve, A. V.
Chapter: 22 (Page no: 336) Feed-based approaches in enteric methane amelioration. Author(s): Malik, P. K. Bhatta, R. Soren, N. M. Sejian, V. Mech, A. Prasad, K. S. Prasad, C. S.
Chapter: 23 (Page no: 360) Methanotrophs in enteric methane mitigation. Author(s): Soren, N. M. Malik, P. K. Sejian, V.
Chapter: 24 (Page no: 376) Summary. Author(s): Malik, P. K. Bhatta, R. Saravanan, M. Baruah, L.

Chapter details

  • Author Affiliation
  • Dept of Dairy Science, Virginia Tech, 2080 Litton Reaves Hall, Blacksburg, VA 24061, USA.
  • Year of Publication
  • 2015
  • ISBN
  • 9781780644325
  • Record Number
  • 20153123673