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CABI Book Chapter

Pest risk modelling and mapping for invasive alien species.

Book cover for Pest risk modelling and mapping for invasive alien species.

Description

The International Pest Risk Mapping Workgroup acknowledges that advanced training and a 'tool kit' of software packages are needed to produce pest risk maps that are fully fit for purpose. This book is an initial attempt to address those needs. Invited chapters emphasize specific steps and data requirements to guide users through the development of pest risk models and maps, or components thereof....

Metrics

Chapter 2 (Page no: 18)

Mapping endangered areas for pest risk analysis.

This chapter provides guidance on mapping risks posed by invasive alien species to support pest risk analysis (PRA), the process required to justify phytosanitary measures. Because pest risk mapping can be challenging and resource-intensive, the situations in which risk maps are particularly useful are highlighted. The procedures described focus on mapping areas where the pest can establish and potentially cause the greatest harm. In the first stage of risk mapping, the factors that might influence the potential distribution and impacts of an invasive alien species are identified and the data are assembled and mapped. In the second stage, the maps of each factor are combined using matrix rules to generate areas of potential establishment and highest risk. These general procedures are illustrated with two examples. Risk maps for the western corn rootworm, a maize pest that has invaded Europe, are based on the combination of maps of climatic suitability, the presence of sandy soils, the distribution of grain and forage maize and the value of these commodities in Europe. Uncertainty is estimated by varying the classification of climatic suitability to obtain the worst, best and most likely scenarios. Risk maps for the common water hyacinth, an invasive plant on the Iberian Peninsula, are based on maps of climatic suitability, the distribution of suitable wetland habitats and areas of conservation importance. The chapter concludes by summarizing some of the major challenges that remain to enhance the production of risk maps for PRA and their interpretation by risk managers.

Other chapters from this book

Chapter: 1 (Page no: 1) The challenge of modelling and mapping the future distribution and impact of invasive alien species. Author(s): Venette, R. C.
Chapter: 3 (Page no: 35) Following the transportation trail to anticipate human-mediated invasions in terrestrial ecosystems. Author(s): Colunga-Garcia, M. Haack, R. A.
Chapter: 4 (Page no: 49) Simulation modelling of long-distance windborne dispersal for invasion ecology. Author(s): Parry, H. R. Eagles, D. Kriticos, D. J.
Chapter: 5 (Page no: 65) Using the MAXENT program for species distribution modelling to assess invasion risk. Author(s): Jarnevich, C. S. Young, N.
Chapter: 6 (Page no: 82) The NCSU/APHIS plant pest forecasting system (NAPPFAST). Author(s): Magarey, R. D. Borchert, D. M. Fowler, G. A. Hong, S. C.
Chapter: 7 (Page no: 97) Detecting and interpreting patterns within regional pest species assemblages using self-organizing maps and other clustering methods. Author(s): Worner, S. Eschen, R. Kenis, M. Paini, D. Saikkonen, K. Suiter, K. Sunil Singh Vänninen, I. Watts, M.
Chapter: 8 (Page no: 115) Modelling the spread of invasive species to support pest risk assessment: principles and application of a suite of generic models. Author(s): Robinet, C. Kehlenbeck, H. Werf, W. van der
Chapter: 9 (Page no: 131) Estimating spread rates of non-native species: the gypsy moth as a case study. Author(s): Tobin, P. C. Liebhold, A. M. Roberts, E. A. Blackburn, L. M.
Chapter: 10 (Page no: 145) Predicting the economic impacts of invasive species: the eradication of the giant sensitive plant from Western Australia. Author(s): Cook, D. C. Sheppard, A. Liu Shuang Lonsdale, W. M.
Chapter: 11 (Page no: 162) Spatial modelling approaches for understanding and predicting the impacts of invasive alien species on native species and ecosystems. Author(s): Allen, C. R. Uden, D. R. Johnson, A. R. Angeler, D. G.
Chapter: 12 (Page no: 171) Process-based pest risk mapping using Bayesian networks and GIS. Author(s): Klinken, R. D. van Murray, J. V. Smith, C.
Chapter: 13 (Page no: 189) Identifying and assessing critical uncertainty thresholds in a forest pest risk model. Author(s): Koch, F. H. Yemshanov, D.
Chapter: 14 (Page no: 206) Making invasion models useful for decision makers: incorporating uncertainty, knowledge gaps and decision-making preferences. Author(s): Yemshanov, D. Koch, F. H. Ducey, M.
Chapter: 15 (Page no: 223) Assessing the quality of pest risk models. Author(s): Venette, S. J.