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Ebooks on agriculture and the applied life sciences from CAB International

CABI Book Chapter

Livestock handling and transport.

Book cover for Livestock handling and transport.

Description

This practical book integrates scientific research and industry literature on cattle, pigs, poultry, sheep, goats, deer, and horses, in both the developed and developing world, to provide a practical guide to humane handling and minimizing animal stress. Reviewing the latest research on transport systems, restraint methods and facilities for farms and slaughterhouses, this fully updated fourth edi...

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Chapter 10 (Page no: 174)

Handling and transport of cattle and pigs in South America.

This chapter covers animal handling and transport research in Brazil, Chile and Uruguay. Data collected from 2005 to 2012 clearly show that bruising and other damage to beef and pork carcasses can be greatly reduced by training truck drivers and handlers, and by simple improvements in facilities. Poor design and operation of the door on the beef stunning box caused 36.5% of the bruises. After training and improvements, the percentage of cattle bruised was halved. Cattle that passed through markets on the way to slaughter had four times the risk of having meat of a high pH (>5.8) compared with cattle that were shipped direct. Another advantage of the adoption of low stress handling methods is less stress on the stock people. During cattle truck loading, the elimination of electric prods, hitting and shouting reduced bruising from over two per carcass to less than one. When better methods are used for handling cattle, corrals can be built from less expensive and more economical, for example solid fences that block the animal's vision can be constructed from vertical bamboo strips attached to a wire or wood plank fence. The chapter also provides details of a low cost corral layout and photos of typical South American trucks. The training of handlers and the installation of non-slip floors, solid shields to block cattle vision and head holders improved stunning and reduced both vocalization and the use of electric prods. Further improvements are still needed. In one study, for instance, 17% of the cattle vocalized and 38% struggled in the stun box. A vocalization percentage of 5% or less is an achievable goal.

Other chapters from this book

Chapter: 1 (Page no: 1) A whole systems approach to assessing animal welfare during handling and restraint. Author(s): Grandin, T.
Chapter: 2 (Page no: 14) General principles of stress and well-being. Author(s): Siegel, P. B. Honaker, C. F.
Chapter: 3 (Page no: 23) Welfare of transported animals: factors influencing welfare and welfare assessment. Author(s): Broom, D. M.
Chapter: 4 (Page no: 39) Behavioural principles of handling cattle and other grazing animals under extensive conditions. Author(s): Grandin, T.
Chapter: 5 (Page no: 65) Low-stress restraint, handling and sorting of cattle. Author(s): Stookey, J. M. Watts, J. M.
Chapter: 6 (Page no: 77) Handling cattle raised in close association with people. Author(s): Ewbank, R. Parker, M.
Chapter: 7 (Page no: 94) Handling facilities and restraint of extensively raised range cattle. Author(s): Grandin, T.
Chapter: 8 (Page no: 116) Dairy cattle behaviour, facilities, handling, transport, automation and well-being. Author(s): Fulwider, W. K.
Chapter: 9 (Page no: 143) Cattle transport by road. Author(s): Schwartzkopf-Genswein, K. Grandin, T.
Chapter: 11 (Page no: 193) Behavioural principles of sheep handling. Author(s): Hutson, G. D. Grandin, T.
Chapter: 12 (Page no: 218) Design of sheep yards and shearing sheds. Author(s): Barber, A. Freeman, R. B.
Chapter: 13 (Page no: 228) Sheep transport. Author(s): Cockram, M. S.
Chapter: 14 (Page no: 245) Dogs for herding and guarding livestock. Author(s): Coppinger, L. Coppinger, R.
Chapter: 15 (Page no: 261) Behavioural principles of pig handling. Author(s): Hemsworth, P. H.
Chapter: 16 (Page no: 280) Transport of pigs. Author(s): Lambooij, E.
Chapter: 17 (Page no: 298) Transport of market pigs: improvements in welfare and economics. Author(s): McGlone, J. J. Johnson, A. K. Sapkota, A. Kephart, R. K.
Chapter: 18 (Page no: 315) Handling and transport of horses. Author(s): Houpt, K. A. Wickens, C. L.
Chapter: 19 (Page no: 342) Deer handling and transport. Author(s): Goddard, P.
Chapter: 20 (Page no: 378) Poultry handling and transport. Author(s): Weeks, C. A.
Chapter: 21 (Page no: 399) Stress physiology of animals during transport. Author(s): Knowles, T. G. Warriss, P. D. Vogel, K.
Chapter: 22 (Page no: 421) Improving welfare and reducing stress on animals at slaughter plants. Author(s): Grandin, T.
Chapter: 23 (Page no: 451) Principles of biosecurity during transport, handling and slaughter of animals. Author(s): Belk, K. E. Grandin, T.

Chapter details

  • Author Affiliation
  • Grupo de Estudos e Pesquisas em Etologia e Ecologia Animal (Grupo ETCO), Facultad de Ciências Agrárias e Veterinárias, Universidade Estadual Paulista "Júlio de Mesquita Filho" (UNESP), São Paulo, Brazil.
  • Year of Publication
  • 2014
  • ISBN
  • 9781780643212
  • Record Number
  • 20143217261