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CABI Book Chapter

Livestock handling and transport.

Book cover for Livestock handling and transport.

Description

This practical book integrates scientific research and industry literature on cattle, pigs, poultry, sheep, goats, deer, and horses, in both the developed and developing world, to provide a practical guide to humane handling and minimizing animal stress. Reviewing the latest research on transport systems, restraint methods and facilities for farms and slaughterhouses, this fully updated fourth edi...

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Chapter 9 (Page no: 143)

Cattle transport by road.

It is interesting to note that since the first edition of this book the most significant welfare concerns for cattle during transport have remained unchanged. These concerns include the transport of unfit (sick, emaciated, debilitated) cattle, overloading - particularly in lightweight and young animals, and excessive transport distances with long periods between food, water and rest. There is also concern about marketing through auctions, and more information is needed on transportation durations experienced by cattle (usually of poor condition or quality) that are sold and resold through the auction markets. Trips of over 30 h should be avoided if possible because death losses increase sharply. Ambient temperatures below -15°C or above 30°C are detrimental, and space allowances (using an allometric coefficient, the k value) lower than 0.015 and greater than 0.035 are associated with greater losses. Cattle that lose 10% of their body weight during transport have a greater likelihood of dying, becoming non-ambulatory or lame. A recent study of health records from many feedlots indicated that mortality was 1.3% and sickness 4.9%. Truck drivers with more years of experience had fewer compromised animals. Feeder cattle destined to feedlots were twice as likely to die during transport compared with fattened cattle. To provide incentives to reduce losses, there needs to be economic accountability throughout the supply chain for dead, non-ambulatory cattle, bruises and dark cutting meat.

Other chapters from this book

Chapter: 1 (Page no: 1) A whole systems approach to assessing animal welfare during handling and restraint. Author(s): Grandin, T.
Chapter: 2 (Page no: 14) General principles of stress and well-being. Author(s): Siegel, P. B. Honaker, C. F.
Chapter: 3 (Page no: 23) Welfare of transported animals: factors influencing welfare and welfare assessment. Author(s): Broom, D. M.
Chapter: 4 (Page no: 39) Behavioural principles of handling cattle and other grazing animals under extensive conditions. Author(s): Grandin, T.
Chapter: 5 (Page no: 65) Low-stress restraint, handling and sorting of cattle. Author(s): Stookey, J. M. Watts, J. M.
Chapter: 6 (Page no: 77) Handling cattle raised in close association with people. Author(s): Ewbank, R. Parker, M.
Chapter: 7 (Page no: 94) Handling facilities and restraint of extensively raised range cattle. Author(s): Grandin, T.
Chapter: 8 (Page no: 116) Dairy cattle behaviour, facilities, handling, transport, automation and well-being. Author(s): Fulwider, W. K.
Chapter: 10 (Page no: 174) Handling and transport of cattle and pigs in South America. Author(s): Costa, M. J. R. P. da Huertas, S. M. Strappini, A. C. Gallo, C.
Chapter: 11 (Page no: 193) Behavioural principles of sheep handling. Author(s): Hutson, G. D. Grandin, T.
Chapter: 12 (Page no: 218) Design of sheep yards and shearing sheds. Author(s): Barber, A. Freeman, R. B.
Chapter: 13 (Page no: 228) Sheep transport. Author(s): Cockram, M. S.
Chapter: 14 (Page no: 245) Dogs for herding and guarding livestock. Author(s): Coppinger, L. Coppinger, R.
Chapter: 15 (Page no: 261) Behavioural principles of pig handling. Author(s): Hemsworth, P. H.
Chapter: 16 (Page no: 280) Transport of pigs. Author(s): Lambooij, E.
Chapter: 17 (Page no: 298) Transport of market pigs: improvements in welfare and economics. Author(s): McGlone, J. J. Johnson, A. K. Sapkota, A. Kephart, R. K.
Chapter: 18 (Page no: 315) Handling and transport of horses. Author(s): Houpt, K. A. Wickens, C. L.
Chapter: 19 (Page no: 342) Deer handling and transport. Author(s): Goddard, P.
Chapter: 20 (Page no: 378) Poultry handling and transport. Author(s): Weeks, C. A.
Chapter: 21 (Page no: 399) Stress physiology of animals during transport. Author(s): Knowles, T. G. Warriss, P. D. Vogel, K.
Chapter: 22 (Page no: 421) Improving welfare and reducing stress on animals at slaughter plants. Author(s): Grandin, T.
Chapter: 23 (Page no: 451) Principles of biosecurity during transport, handling and slaughter of animals. Author(s): Belk, K. E. Grandin, T.

Chapter details

  • Author Affiliation
  • Lethbridge Research Centre, Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, Lethbridge, T1J 4B1, Alberta, Canada.
  • Year of Publication
  • 2014
  • ISBN
  • 9781780643212
  • Record Number
  • 20143217260