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CABI Book Chapter

Livestock handling and transport.

Book cover for Livestock handling and transport.

Description

This practical book integrates scientific research and industry literature on cattle, pigs, poultry, sheep, goats, deer, and horses, in both the developed and developing world, to provide a practical guide to humane handling and minimizing animal stress. Reviewing the latest research on transport systems, restraint methods and facilities for farms and slaughterhouses, this fully updated fourth edi...

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Chapter 7 (Page no: 94)

Handling facilities and restraint of extensively raised range cattle.

Single-file races and cattle yards using behavioural principles will improve animal handling efficiency and reduce stress. A round crowd pen built in a full half circle with solid sides takes advantage of the natural behaviour of cattle to go back to where they came from. Single-file or double-file races should hold sufficient cattle to encourage following of the leader. Extensively raised cattle and other livestock that are not completely tame will remain calmer in single-file races if they do not see people in their flight zone, so people either need to remain outside the flight zone or a solid fence should be installed to block the animals' vision. In feedlots, truck-loading ramps and slaughter plants, where there are many visual distractions - such as vehicles, people or moving equipment - a completely solid fence on the outer perimeter fences is recommended. The fence on the inner radius of a curved single-file race can remain open on the top half to enable a skilled handler to work the flight zone. To reduce stress, cattle and other extensively raised animals should be acclimatized and habituated to handling procedures by walking them through the corrals. The advantages and disadvantages of different types of squeeze chutes for restraining cattle are also discussed. Animals can be trained to voluntarily accept being restrained, which can greatly reduce stress. Farm animals with flighty and excitable genetics must be introduced more slowly to new things than animals with calmer genetics. The chapter contains layouts, diagrams and information on the design of curved races, circular crowd pens, corrals, yards and squeeze chutes.

Other chapters from this book

Chapter: 1 (Page no: 1) A whole systems approach to assessing animal welfare during handling and restraint. Author(s): Grandin, T.
Chapter: 2 (Page no: 14) General principles of stress and well-being. Author(s): Siegel, P. B. Honaker, C. F.
Chapter: 3 (Page no: 23) Welfare of transported animals: factors influencing welfare and welfare assessment. Author(s): Broom, D. M.
Chapter: 4 (Page no: 39) Behavioural principles of handling cattle and other grazing animals under extensive conditions. Author(s): Grandin, T.
Chapter: 5 (Page no: 65) Low-stress restraint, handling and sorting of cattle. Author(s): Stookey, J. M. Watts, J. M.
Chapter: 6 (Page no: 77) Handling cattle raised in close association with people. Author(s): Ewbank, R. Parker, M.
Chapter: 8 (Page no: 116) Dairy cattle behaviour, facilities, handling, transport, automation and well-being. Author(s): Fulwider, W. K.
Chapter: 9 (Page no: 143) Cattle transport by road. Author(s): Schwartzkopf-Genswein, K. Grandin, T.
Chapter: 10 (Page no: 174) Handling and transport of cattle and pigs in South America. Author(s): Costa, M. J. R. P. da Huertas, S. M. Strappini, A. C. Gallo, C.
Chapter: 11 (Page no: 193) Behavioural principles of sheep handling. Author(s): Hutson, G. D. Grandin, T.
Chapter: 12 (Page no: 218) Design of sheep yards and shearing sheds. Author(s): Barber, A. Freeman, R. B.
Chapter: 13 (Page no: 228) Sheep transport. Author(s): Cockram, M. S.
Chapter: 14 (Page no: 245) Dogs for herding and guarding livestock. Author(s): Coppinger, L. Coppinger, R.
Chapter: 15 (Page no: 261) Behavioural principles of pig handling. Author(s): Hemsworth, P. H.
Chapter: 16 (Page no: 280) Transport of pigs. Author(s): Lambooij, E.
Chapter: 17 (Page no: 298) Transport of market pigs: improvements in welfare and economics. Author(s): McGlone, J. J. Johnson, A. K. Sapkota, A. Kephart, R. K.
Chapter: 18 (Page no: 315) Handling and transport of horses. Author(s): Houpt, K. A. Wickens, C. L.
Chapter: 19 (Page no: 342) Deer handling and transport. Author(s): Goddard, P.
Chapter: 20 (Page no: 378) Poultry handling and transport. Author(s): Weeks, C. A.
Chapter: 21 (Page no: 399) Stress physiology of animals during transport. Author(s): Knowles, T. G. Warriss, P. D. Vogel, K.
Chapter: 22 (Page no: 421) Improving welfare and reducing stress on animals at slaughter plants. Author(s): Grandin, T.
Chapter: 23 (Page no: 451) Principles of biosecurity during transport, handling and slaughter of animals. Author(s): Belk, K. E. Grandin, T.

Chapter details

  • Author Affiliation
  • Department of Animal Sciences, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO 80523-1171, USA.
  • Year of Publication
  • 2014
  • ISBN
  • 9781780643212
  • Record Number
  • 20143217258