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Ebooks on agriculture and the applied life sciences from CAB International

CABI Book Chapter

Livestock handling and transport.

Book cover for Livestock handling and transport.

Description

This practical book integrates scientific research and industry literature on cattle, pigs, poultry, sheep, goats, deer, and horses, in both the developed and developing world, to provide a practical guide to humane handling and minimizing animal stress. Reviewing the latest research on transport systems, restraint methods and facilities for farms and slaughterhouses, this fully updated fourth edi...

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Chapter 4 (Page no: 39)

Behavioural principles of handling cattle and other grazing animals under extensive conditions.

Cattle acclimatized to both people and handling facilities have lower stress and improved productivity. Fearful cattle will show eye white and switch their tails back and forth. In chutes, corrals and other facilities, visual distractions, such as shadows, reflections, a coat on a fence or puddles of water can cause cattle to balk and refuse to move through a facility. Cattle are attracted to light and may refuse to enter a dark building. In indoor facilities, lamps can be used to attract animals. Handlers need to understand behavioural principles such as the flight zone and point of balance of animals. There are five instinctive behaviours that affect how grazing animals behave during handling. These are: (i) the flight zone - animals turn and face a potential threat and keep safe distance; (ii) the point of balance; (iii) animals going back to where they came from; (iv) loose bunching in a herd; and (v) fearful agitated behaviour with animals milling tightly in a circle. Handlers should use the following behaviour of animals to promote their movement, and fill a crowd pen that leads to a single-file race half full. Completely tame animals lose these behavioural patterns and must be led instead of driven. Cattle should be acclimatized to different people, vehicles and handling procedures. Sudden novel events are frightening to animals.

Other chapters from this book

Chapter: 1 (Page no: 1) A whole systems approach to assessing animal welfare during handling and restraint. Author(s): Grandin, T.
Chapter: 2 (Page no: 14) General principles of stress and well-being. Author(s): Siegel, P. B. Honaker, C. F.
Chapter: 3 (Page no: 23) Welfare of transported animals: factors influencing welfare and welfare assessment. Author(s): Broom, D. M.
Chapter: 5 (Page no: 65) Low-stress restraint, handling and sorting of cattle. Author(s): Stookey, J. M. Watts, J. M.
Chapter: 6 (Page no: 77) Handling cattle raised in close association with people. Author(s): Ewbank, R. Parker, M.
Chapter: 7 (Page no: 94) Handling facilities and restraint of extensively raised range cattle. Author(s): Grandin, T.
Chapter: 8 (Page no: 116) Dairy cattle behaviour, facilities, handling, transport, automation and well-being. Author(s): Fulwider, W. K.
Chapter: 9 (Page no: 143) Cattle transport by road. Author(s): Schwartzkopf-Genswein, K. Grandin, T.
Chapter: 10 (Page no: 174) Handling and transport of cattle and pigs in South America. Author(s): Costa, M. J. R. P. da Huertas, S. M. Strappini, A. C. Gallo, C.
Chapter: 11 (Page no: 193) Behavioural principles of sheep handling. Author(s): Hutson, G. D. Grandin, T.
Chapter: 12 (Page no: 218) Design of sheep yards and shearing sheds. Author(s): Barber, A. Freeman, R. B.
Chapter: 13 (Page no: 228) Sheep transport. Author(s): Cockram, M. S.
Chapter: 14 (Page no: 245) Dogs for herding and guarding livestock. Author(s): Coppinger, L. Coppinger, R.
Chapter: 15 (Page no: 261) Behavioural principles of pig handling. Author(s): Hemsworth, P. H.
Chapter: 16 (Page no: 280) Transport of pigs. Author(s): Lambooij, E.
Chapter: 17 (Page no: 298) Transport of market pigs: improvements in welfare and economics. Author(s): McGlone, J. J. Johnson, A. K. Sapkota, A. Kephart, R. K.
Chapter: 18 (Page no: 315) Handling and transport of horses. Author(s): Houpt, K. A. Wickens, C. L.
Chapter: 19 (Page no: 342) Deer handling and transport. Author(s): Goddard, P.
Chapter: 20 (Page no: 378) Poultry handling and transport. Author(s): Weeks, C. A.
Chapter: 21 (Page no: 399) Stress physiology of animals during transport. Author(s): Knowles, T. G. Warriss, P. D. Vogel, K.
Chapter: 22 (Page no: 421) Improving welfare and reducing stress on animals at slaughter plants. Author(s): Grandin, T.
Chapter: 23 (Page no: 451) Principles of biosecurity during transport, handling and slaughter of animals. Author(s): Belk, K. E. Grandin, T.

Chapter details

  • Author Affiliation
  • Department of Animal Sciences, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO 80523-1171, USA.
  • Year of Publication
  • 2014
  • ISBN
  • 9781780643212
  • Record Number
  • 20143217255