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CABI Book Chapter

Livestock handling and transport.

Book cover for Livestock handling and transport.

Description

This practical book integrates scientific research and industry literature on cattle, pigs, poultry, sheep, goats, deer, and horses, in both the developed and developing world, to provide a practical guide to humane handling and minimizing animal stress. Reviewing the latest research on transport systems, restraint methods and facilities for farms and slaughterhouses, this fully updated fourth edi...

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Chapter 1 (Page no: 1)

A whole systems approach to assessing animal welfare during handling and restraint.

To optimize animal welfare, whole handling systems must be evaluated because there are trade-offs between the different components of an entire system. Some of the factors that will affect the best choice of a handling system are: (i) the skill level of the stock people; (ii) the behavioural characteristics of the animals; and (iii) the design of the races, chutes or corrals. A simple handling system - which may be acceptable for tame cattle that are trained to lead - may have serious welfare problems if it is used with extensively raised sheep or cattle with large flight zones. There are two approaches to facility design: (i) low cost but highly dependent on stock person skills; or (ii) higher cost but easily operated by less skilled people. The choice of race or of yard design is also affected by breed of the animal and its previous handling experiences. Cattle, pigs and sheep will be easier to handle if they are acclimatized to people walking through them. An example of a trade-off in facility design is controlled atmosphere (CAS) stunning of chickens versus electrical stunning. CAS provides the advantage of less stressful handling because live shackling is eliminated; its disadvantage is that unconsciousness is not instantaneous. Some discomfort during the induction of unconsciousness, such as gasping, is offset by less handling stress. All CAS stunning systems should be evaluated by observing the behaviour of the animal before it becomes unconscious and loses the ability to stand.

Other chapters from this book

Chapter: 2 (Page no: 14) General principles of stress and well-being. Author(s): Siegel, P. B. Honaker, C. F.
Chapter: 3 (Page no: 23) Welfare of transported animals: factors influencing welfare and welfare assessment. Author(s): Broom, D. M.
Chapter: 4 (Page no: 39) Behavioural principles of handling cattle and other grazing animals under extensive conditions. Author(s): Grandin, T.
Chapter: 5 (Page no: 65) Low-stress restraint, handling and sorting of cattle. Author(s): Stookey, J. M. Watts, J. M.
Chapter: 6 (Page no: 77) Handling cattle raised in close association with people. Author(s): Ewbank, R. Parker, M.
Chapter: 7 (Page no: 94) Handling facilities and restraint of extensively raised range cattle. Author(s): Grandin, T.
Chapter: 8 (Page no: 116) Dairy cattle behaviour, facilities, handling, transport, automation and well-being. Author(s): Fulwider, W. K.
Chapter: 9 (Page no: 143) Cattle transport by road. Author(s): Schwartzkopf-Genswein, K. Grandin, T.
Chapter: 10 (Page no: 174) Handling and transport of cattle and pigs in South America. Author(s): Costa, M. J. R. P. da Huertas, S. M. Strappini, A. C. Gallo, C.
Chapter: 11 (Page no: 193) Behavioural principles of sheep handling. Author(s): Hutson, G. D. Grandin, T.
Chapter: 12 (Page no: 218) Design of sheep yards and shearing sheds. Author(s): Barber, A. Freeman, R. B.
Chapter: 13 (Page no: 228) Sheep transport. Author(s): Cockram, M. S.
Chapter: 14 (Page no: 245) Dogs for herding and guarding livestock. Author(s): Coppinger, L. Coppinger, R.
Chapter: 15 (Page no: 261) Behavioural principles of pig handling. Author(s): Hemsworth, P. H.
Chapter: 16 (Page no: 280) Transport of pigs. Author(s): Lambooij, E.
Chapter: 17 (Page no: 298) Transport of market pigs: improvements in welfare and economics. Author(s): McGlone, J. J. Johnson, A. K. Sapkota, A. Kephart, R. K.
Chapter: 18 (Page no: 315) Handling and transport of horses. Author(s): Houpt, K. A. Wickens, C. L.
Chapter: 19 (Page no: 342) Deer handling and transport. Author(s): Goddard, P.
Chapter: 20 (Page no: 378) Poultry handling and transport. Author(s): Weeks, C. A.
Chapter: 21 (Page no: 399) Stress physiology of animals during transport. Author(s): Knowles, T. G. Warriss, P. D. Vogel, K.
Chapter: 22 (Page no: 421) Improving welfare and reducing stress on animals at slaughter plants. Author(s): Grandin, T.
Chapter: 23 (Page no: 451) Principles of biosecurity during transport, handling and slaughter of animals. Author(s): Belk, K. E. Grandin, T.

Chapter details

  • Author Affiliation
  • Department of Animal Sciences, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO 80523-1171, USA.
  • Year of Publication
  • 2014
  • ISBN
  • 9781780643212
  • Record Number
  • 20143217252