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CABI Book Chapter

Vegetable production and marketing in Africa: socio-economic research.

Book cover for Vegetable production and marketing in Africa: socio-economic research.

Description

This book provides a collection of conceptual and methodological chapters on the socio-economic aspects of vegetable production-to-marketing systems in Africa. The diverse topics covered in this book include the conceptual challenges in economic research on vegetable production systems, the implications of good agricultural practice standards, the challenges and opportunities of meeting the growin...

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Chapter 16 (Page no: 243)

Integrated pest management training and information flow among smallholder horticulture farmers in Kenya.

A study was conducted in 5 districts in Kenya (Muranga, Thika and Maragua in Central Province, and Makueni and Embu in Eastern Province) to determine the factors linked to the acquisition of integrated pest management (IPM) knowledge and sharing among the two different group-based farmers, as well as among farmers operating individually (the control group). Data were collected from May to July 2008 focusing on active smallholder vegetable and fruit producers grouped in three categories: farmer field schools (FFS) members, common interest rgroups (CIG) members, and control farmers. The control farmers were not members of the two group-based training approaches, but they were sampled from the same villages as the FFS and CIG farmers. According to the marginal effect result, FFS and CIG membership, the number of groups to which farmers belonged (excluding FFS and CIG), farmer household memberś literacy and locality positively and significantly affected IPM knowledge acquisition, whereas household size, land size, permanent labour, casual labour, access to horticulture production information, distance to extension services, farmer visitors, frequency of listening to horticulture production information on the radio, and frequency of reading newspaper articles on horticulture production negatively and significantly affected IPM knowledge acquisition. Knowledge sharing was significantly and positively associated with the number of casual labourers employed, IPM knowledge acquisition, and the number of visitors received, whereas membership in FFS, gender and locality significantly and negatively affected IPM knowledge sharing.

Other chapters from this book

Chapter: 1 (Page no: 1) An overview. Author(s): Waibel, H. Mithöfer, D.
Chapter: 2 (Page no: 9) Theoretical concepts for socio-economic research of vegetables in Africa. Author(s): Waibel, H.
Chapter: 3 (Page no: 25) Framework for economic impact assessment of production standards and empirical evidence. Author(s): Mithöfer, D.
Chapter: 4 (Page no: 45) The impact of food safety standards on rural household welfare. Author(s): Asfaw, S.
Chapter: 5 (Page no: 67) The impact of compliance with GlobalGAP standards on small and large Kenyan export vegetable-producing farms. Author(s): Mausch, K. Mithöfer, D.
Chapter: 6 (Page no: 85) Food production standards and farm worker welfare in Kenya. Author(s): Ehlert, C. Mithöfer, D. Waibel, H.
Chapter: 7 (Page no: 97) Group culture and smallholder participation in value chains: French beans in Kenya. Author(s): Paalhaar, J. Jansen, K.
Chapter: 8 (Page no: 111) Export vegetable supply chains and rural households in Senegal. Author(s): Maertens, M. Colen, L. Swinnen, J.
Chapter: 9 (Page no: 127) Comparative assessment of the marketing structure and price behaviour of three staple vegetables in Lusaka, Zambia. Author(s): Tschirley, D. Hichaambwa, M. Mwiinga, M.
Chapter: 10 (Page no: 149) Value chains and regional trade in East Africa: the case of vegetables in Kenya and Tanzania. Author(s): König, T. Blatt, J. Brakel, K. Kloss, K. Nilges, T. Woellert, F.
Chapter: 11 (Page no: 169) Supply chains for indigenous vegetables in urban and peri-urban areas of Uganda and Kenya: a gendered perspective. Author(s): Weinberger, K. Pasquini, M. Kasambula, P. Abukutsa-Onyango, M.
Chapter: 12 (Page no: 183) Private voluntary standards, co-investment and inclusive business. Author(s): Blackmore, E. MacGregor, J.
Chapter: 13 (Page no: 195) An approach to strengthening vegetable value chains in East Africa: potential for spillovers. Author(s): Lenné, J. M. Ward, A. F.
Chapter: 14 (Page no: 209) Challenges for economic impact assessment of classical biological control in Kenya and Tanzania. Author(s): Asfaw, A. Mithöfer, D. Löhr, B. Waibel, H.
Chapter: 15 (Page no: 227) Indirect and external costs of pesticide use in the vegetable sub-sector in Kenya. Author(s): Macharia, I. Mithöfer, D. Waibel, H.