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CABI Book Chapter

Sustainable farmland management: transdisciplinary approaches.

Book cover for Sustainable farmland management: transdisciplinary approaches.

Description

This edited collection is an exercise in transdisciplinary reflection on sustainable farmland management. It includes contributions from leading academics and emerging researchers from a range of disciplinary backgrounds including economics, agricultural sciences, geography and environmental sciences, as well as practitioners and researchers from NGOs, government agencies and consultancies, who ar...

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Chapter 11 (Page no: 125)

A notional ethical contract with farm animals in a sustainable global food system.

This chapter argues for a new ethical theory to inform and justify a continued use of animals in the global food system. It begins with a consideration of the utilitarian justifications for using animals as sources of food, as well as the attitudinal and legal justifications for animal use in agriculture. Utilitarian constrains on animal use in agriculture are then discussed, as well as economic and environmental constraints on modern animal production systems. A notional ethical contract with animals is then proposed. Given the co-evolution of humans and non-human animals, and the vital roles those animals we have domesticated could play in a humane, well-managed, sustainable food system, it is argued that there is a strong case for revising the basis of our continued relationship with them to one that is based on a notional contract: an arrangement by which animals continue to provide benefits to humans and the environment, but themselves live out better lives than they would in the wild.

Other chapters from this book

Chapter: 1 (Page no: 1) Agendas for sustainable farmland management. Author(s): Fish, R. Seymour, S. Watkins, C. Steven, M.
Chapter: 2 (Page no: 25) The elusive quest for sustainable agriculture. Author(s): O'Riordan, T.
Chapter: 3 (Page no: 30) The contested concept of sustainability in agriculture: an examination of the views of policymakers, scientists and farmers. Author(s): Baginetas, K. N.
Chapter: 4 (Page no: 42) Historical dimensions of sustainable farming. Author(s): Beckett, J. V.
Chapter: 5 (Page no: 49) Soils and sustainability: the future of the South Downs. Author(s): Boardman, J.
Chapter: 6 (Page no: 58) The role of organics within sustainable farmland management. Author(s): Reed, M.
Chapter: 7 (Page no: 69) Just knowledge? Governing research on food and farming. Author(s): MacMillan, T.
Chapter: 8 (Page no: 77) Agricultural advisers and the transition to sustainable soil management in England: a focus on agronomists' understanding of soil. Author(s): Ingram, J.
Chapter: 9 (Page no: 94) Combining scientific and lay knowledges: participatory approaches to research in organic farming. Author(s): Lyon, F. Harris, F.
Chapter: 10 (Page no: 107) Sustainable foodscapes? Examining consumer attitudes and practices towards food and farming in Washington State, USA. Author(s): Selfa, T. Jussaume, R. A., Jr.
Chapter: 12 (Page no: 135) Beasts of a different burden: agricultural sustainability and farm animals. Author(s): Buller, H. Morris, C.
Chapter: 13 (Page no: 149) Agricultural biotechnology and ethics: for or against nature? Author(s): Johnson, B. R.
Chapter: 14 (Page no: 161) Multifunctionality in practice: research and application within a farm business. Author(s): Stoate, C.
Chapter: 15 (Page no: 169) Linking environment and farming: integrated systems for sustainable farmland management. Author(s): Drummond, C. Harris, C.
Chapter: 16 (Page no: 178) Environmental and profitable sustainability in agricultural production. Author(s): Williams, A.
Chapter: 17 (Page no: 194) The use of indicators to assess the sustainability of farms converting to organic production. Author(s): Firth, C. Milla, I. Harris, P.
Chapter: 18 (Page no: 203) Agri-environment schemes and sustainable farmland management: a farm level assessment of the economic costs and benefits. Author(s): Jones, J.
Chapter: 19 (Page no: 217) International perspectives on sustainable farmland management. Author(s): Potter, C.
Chapter: 20 (Page no: 223) The national policy dimension for environmentally sustainable agriculture: a UK perspective. Author(s): Morgan, G. Reid, C.
Chapter: 21 (Page no: 236) Multifunctional agriculture and integrated rural development in Germany: the case of the Regional Action programme. Author(s): Knickel, K. Peter, S.
Chapter: 22 (Page no: 249) Agendas for transdisciplinarity. Author(s): Fish, R. Seymour, S. Watkins, C. Steven, M.

Chapter details

  • Author Affiliation
  • Centre for Applied Bioethics, School of Biosciences, University of Nottingham, Sutton Bonington Campus, Loughborough, LE12 5RD, UK.
  • Year of Publication
  • 2008
  • ISBN
  • 9781845933517
  • Record Number
  • 20093021048