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CABI Book Chapter

New horizons in tourism: strange experiences and stranger practices.

Book cover for New horizons in tourism: strange experiences and stranger practices.

Description

This book illustrates the tremendous outreach of tourism in search of extraordinary, spectacular and bizarre experiences. It covers tourism in out-of-the-ordinary environments (space tourism, Antarctic tourism, and adventure/heritage tourism in remote areas); dark tourism; other unconventional forms of tourism such as deep ecotourism and health tourism in salt mines; and other special-interest for...

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Chapter 8 (Page no: 95)

Tourism and the heritage of atrocity: managing the heritage of South African apartheid for entertainment.

This chapter deals with the management of atrocity heritage sites for tourism, focusing in particular on South African apartheid tourism. The chapter considers the nature and location of the tourism product; the motives of tourists, producers and residents; and finally the management issues. It is indicated that the management of atrocity heritage sites is riddled with difficulties because of the multiple uses of the sites, of which tourism is only one, as well as of the problem of the emotions evoked by such sites, which impose constraints and responsibilities on their management for tourism.

Other chapters from this book

Chapter: 1 (Page no: 1) Tourism searching for new horizons: an overview. Author(s): Singh, T. V.
Chapter: 2 (Page no: 11) Vacationing in space: tourism seeks 'new skies'. Author(s): Laing, J. Crouch, G. I.
Chapter: 3 (Page no: 27) Tourism in the forbidden lands: the Antarctica experience. Author(s): Splettstoesser, J. Landau, D. Headland, R. K.
Chapter: 4 (Page no: 37) Skilled commercial adventure: the edge of tourism. Author(s): Buckley, R.
Chapter: 5 (Page no: 49) Tourism trespasses on the Himalayan heritage: the hermit village, Malana. Author(s): Singh, T. V. Purnima Chauhan Shalini Singh
Chapter: 6 (Page no: 63) Thanatourism in the early 21st century: moral panics, ulterior motives and alterior desires. Author(s): Seaton, A. V. Lennon, J. J.
Chapter: 7 (Page no: 83) Tourism at borders of conflict and (de)militarized zones. Author(s): Timothy, D. J. Prideaux, B. Kim SeongSeop [Kim, S. S. S.]
Chapter: 9 (Page no: 109) Deep ecotourism: seeking theoretical and practical reverence. Author(s): Fennell, D. A.
Chapter: 10 (Page no: 121) Against the wind - impermanence in wilderness: the Tasmanian experience. Author(s): Sofield, T. H. B.
Chapter: 11 (Page no: 135) Health tourism in the Kyrgyz Republic: the Soviet salt mine experience. Author(s): Schofield, P.
Chapter: 12 (Page no: 147) Pro-poor tourism: benefiting the poor. Author(s): Roe, D. Goodwin, H. Ashley, C.
Chapter: 13 (Page no: 163) Tourism for the young-old and old-old. Author(s): Sellick, M. C. Muller, T. E.
Chapter: 14 (Page no: 181) Volunteer tourism: new pilgrimages to the Himalayas. Author(s): Shalini Singh Singh, T. V.
Chapter: 15 (Page no: 195) Will travel vanish? Looking beyond the horizon. Author(s): Aramberri, J. R.

Chapter details

  • Author Affiliation
  • Heritage Management and Urban Tourism, Department of Planning, Faculty of Spatial Science, University of Groningen, Post Box 800, 9700 AV Groningen, Netherlands.
  • Year of Publication
  • 2004
  • ISBN
  • 0851998631
  • Record Number
  • 20043168183