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CABI Book Chapter

Natural resources management in African agriculture: understanding and improving current practices.

Book cover for Natural resources management in African agriculture: understanding and improving current practices.

Description

This book synthesizes existing information on the adoption of natural resource management investments and strategies (such as soil fertility improvements or erosion control) for agriculture in sub-Saharan Africa. It also critically examines current analytical methods and generates research and policy recommendations. Topics covered include: farmers' objectives and learning processes; willingness a...

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Chapter 7 (Page no: 91)

Poverty and land degradation: peasants' willingness to pay to sustain land productivity.

This paper tests the hypotheses that market imperfections and poverty are important determinants of farm households' incentives to conserve their own land. This issue is explored by asking peasants about their willingness to pay (WTP) to sustain the productivity of their own land and by analysing which factors are correlated with their stated WTP. The study was carried out in 1994 in three peasant associations in the Ethiopian highlands. 120 peasant households were surveyed. It is proposed that poverty undermines conservation investment on private land even if peasants are fully aware of the problem and have secure rights to the land. Pervasive market imperfections are necessary for this argument to hold. It is shown that peasants themselves are willing to pay only a small fraction (1.8-3.5%) of the external on-site costs of their own soil-degrading practices.

Other chapters from this book

Chapter: 1 (Page no: 1) The challenge of stimulating adoption of improved natural resource management practices in African agriculture. Author(s): Barrett, C. B. Place, F. Aboud, A. A. Brown, D. R.
Chapter: 2 (Page no: 23) Social capital and social learning in the process of natural resource management. Author(s): Pretty, J. Buck, L.
Chapter: 3 (Page no: 35) The limits of knowledge: securing rural livelihoods in a situation of resource scarcity. Author(s): Peters, P. E.
Chapter: 4 (Page no: 51) Farmers' use and adaptation of alley farming in Nigeria. Author(s): Adesina, A. A. Chianu, J.
Chapter: 5 (Page no: 65) Farmers as co-developers and adopters of green-manure cover crops in West and Central Africa. Author(s): Tarawali, G. Douthwaite, B. Haan, N. C. de Tarawali, S. A.
Chapter: 6 (Page no: 77) Sustainable management of private and communal lands in Northern Ethiopia. Author(s): Gebremedhin, B. Swinton, S. M.
Chapter: 8 (Page no: 103) Input use and conservation investments among farm households in Rwanda: patterns and determinants. Author(s): Clay, D. C. Kelly, V. Mpyisi, E. Reardon, T.
Chapter: 9 (Page no: 115) Agroforestry adoption decisions, structural adjustment and gender in Africa. Author(s): Gladwin, C. H. Peterson, J. S. Phiri, D. Uttaro, R.
Chapter: 10 (Page no: 129) Liquidity and soil management: evidence from Madagascar and Niger. Author(s): Wyatt, T. J.
Chapter: 11 (Page no: 143) Smallholder farmers' use of integrated nutrient-management strategies: patterns and possibilities in Machakos district of Eastern Kenya. Author(s): Freeman, H. A. Coe, R.
Chapter: 12 (Page no: 155) Agroforestry for soil-fertility replenishment: evidence on adoption processes in Kenya and Zambia. Author(s): Place, F. Franzel, S. DeWolf, J. Rommelse, R. Kwesiga, F. Niang, A. Jama, B.
Chapter: 13 (Page no: 169) Evaluating adoption of new crop-livestock-soil-management technologies using georeferenced village-level data: the case of cowpea in the dry savannahs of West Africa. Author(s): Kristjanson, P. Okike, I. Tarawali, S. A. Kruska, R. Manyong, V. M. Singh, B. B.
Chapter: 14 (Page no: 181) Contradictions in agricultural intensification and improved natural resource management: issues in the Fianarantsoa Forest Corridor of Madagascar. Author(s): Freudenberger, M. S. Freudenberger, K. S.
Chapter: 15 (Page no: 193) Synergies between natural resource management practices and fertilizer technologies: lessons from Mali. Author(s): Kelly, V. Sylla, M. L. Galiba, M. Weight, D.
Chapter: 16 (Page no: 205) Soil and water conservation in semi-arid Tanzania: government policy and farmers' practices. Author(s): Hatibu, N. Lazaro, E. A. Mahoo, H. F. Rwehumbiza, F. B. R.
Chapter: 17 (Page no: 219) Initiatives to encourage farmer adoption of soil-fertility technologies for maize-based cropping systems in Southern Africa. Author(s): Mekuria, M. Waddington, S. R.
Chapter: 18 (Page no: 235) A bio-economic model of integrated crop-livestock farming systems: the case of the Ginchi watershed in Ethiopia. Author(s): Okumu, B. N. Jabbar, M. A. Colman, D. Russell, N.
Chapter: 19 (Page no: 251) Nutrient cycling in integrated plant-animal systems: implications for animal management strategies in smallholder farming systems. Author(s): Ndlovu, L. R. Mugabe, P. H.
Chapter: 20 (Page no: 261) Natural resource technologies for semi-arid regions of sub-Saharan Africa. Author(s): Shapiro, B. I. Sanders, J. H.
Chapter: 21 (Page no: 275) Lessons for natural resource management technology adoption and research. Author(s): Place, F. Swallow, B. M. Wangila, J. Barrett, C. B.
Chapter: 22 (Page no: 287) Towards improved natural resource management in African agriculture. Author(s): Barrett, C. B. Lynam, J. Place, F. Reardon, T. Aboud, A. A.

Chapter details

  • Author Affiliation
  • Department of Economics and Social Sciences, Agricultural University of Norway, PO Box 5033, N-1432 Ǻs, Norway.
  • Year of Publication
  • 2002
  • ISBN
  • 0851995845
  • Record Number
  • 20023087424