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Animal Science Database

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Abstract

Author(s)
Vasseur, E.
Publisher
Producteur de Lait Québécois, Longueuil, Canada
Citation
Producteur de Lait Québécois, 2018, 38, 6, pp 30-32
Abstract

Sociality presumably evolved because it leads to fitness benefits; yet we know little about what drives individual variability in sociality, particularly with respect to hierarchical levels of social organization. Social network architecture is based upon dyadic interactions, but the factors...

Author(s)
Wal, E. vander; Gagné-Delorme, A.; Festa-Bianchet, M.; Pelletier, F.
Publisher
Oxford University Press, Cary, USA
Citation
Behavioral Ecology, 2016, 27, 2, pp 560-566
Abstract

This study centers on equestrian show culture in Ontario, Canada, and examines how horses are entangled symbolically and materially in socially constructed hierarchies of value. After examining horse-show social relations and practices, the paper traces the connections among equestrian culture,...

Author(s)
Coulter, K.
Publisher
Brill Academic Publishers, Leiden, Netherlands
Citation
Society & Animals, 2014, 22, 2, pp 135-152
Abstract

Among cooperatively breeding species, delayed dispersal provides an opportunity for older siblings to help rear young. There is considerable variation in the extent to which cooperative breeders delay dispersal, however, and while delayed dispersal may be a consequence of adaptive evolution...

Author(s)
Sparkman, A. M.; Adams, J. R.; Steury, T. D.; Waits, L. P.; Murray, D. L.
Publisher
Elsevier Ltd, Oxford, UK
Citation
Animal Behaviour, 2012, 83, 4, pp 1091-1098
Abstract

Similar to other primate species, captive cynomolgus macaques (Macaca fascicularis) are prone to becoming overweight. The relationship between body condition and feeding behaviour in group-housed animals has not been reported. This study evaluated the effect of daily feeding routines on behaviour...

Author(s)
Bauer, S. A.; Pearl, D. L.; Leslie, K. E.; Fournier, J.; Turner, P. V.
Publisher
Royal Society of Medicine Press Limited, London, UK
Citation
Laboratory Animals, 2012, 46, 3, pp 193-199
Abstract

Author(s)
Mason, G. J.; Bahlmann, K.; Dawson, L.; Dallaire, J. A.; Meagher, R. K.; Bowyer, S.; Diez-Leon, M.; Campbell, D.
Publisher
International Fur Animal Scientific Association, Tjele, Denmark
Citation
Scientifur, 2012, 36, 3/4, pp 491
Abstract

Previous studies indicate that dominant fish grow faster than subordinate fish when fed equal rations. It is unclear, however, whether this growth differential is caused by intrinsic differences related to their propensity to become dominant, or by the extrinsic effect of the social stress...

Author(s)
Lee, G.; Grant, J. W. A.; Comolli, P.
Publisher
Brill Academic Publishers, Leiden, Netherlands
Citation
Behaviour, 2011, 148, 8, pp 877-887
Abstract

Richardson's ground squirrels are social animals that warn conspecifics of a predator's presence through the production of alarm vocalizations. Their ability to discriminate among individual alarm callers and to identify the location of those callers may allow receivers to track predator movement...

Author(s)
Thompson, A. B.; Hare, J. F.
Publisher
Elsevier Ltd, Oxford, UK
Citation
Animal Behaviour, 2010, 80, 2, pp 269-275
Abstract

A study was conducted to determine the behaviour, ecology and effects of shipping activity of narwhals (Monodon monoceros) in Baffin Island in Nunavut, Canada, during the summers of 2006-2008. It was shown that the average group size was 3.6 animals (2-25). Narwhals were sometimes segregated by sex ...

Author(s)
Marcoux, M.
Publisher
Arctic Institute of North America, Calgary, Canada
Citation
Arctic, 2008, 61, 4, pp 456-460
Abstract

In gregarious animals, there is usually a negative relationship between individual vigilance and group size. This effect of group size is generally explained by increasing probability of predator detection (the many-eyes hypothesis) and by the dilution of risk occurring in larger groups. Few...

Author(s)
Rieucau, G.; Martin, J. G. A.
Publisher
Blackwell Publishing, Copenhagen, Denmark
Citation
Oikos, 2008, 117, 4, pp 501-506

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