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Animal Science Database

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Abstract

It is known that tactile stimulation (TS) during ontogeny modifies brain plasticity and enhances the motor and cognitive skills. Our hypothesis was that early handling including TS would increase play and exploratory behaviour in commercial pigs under standardized test conditions. Piglets from 13...

Author(s)
Zupan, M.; Rehn, T.; Oliveira, D. de; Keeling, L. J.
Publisher
Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, UK
Citation
Animal, 2016, 10, 1, pp 135-141
Abstract

Domestic fowl (Gallus gallus domesticus) naturally live in small groups, with a dominance hierarchy (pecking order) which is most likely based on establishment fights, followed by remembered assessment of status involving individual recognition. In larger groups, this system is thought to...

Author(s)
D'Eath, R. B.; Keeling, L. J.
Publisher
Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam, Netherlands
Citation
Applied Animal Behaviour Science, 2003, 84, 3, pp 197-212
Abstract

We hypothesized that whereas domestic fowl in small groups establish a dominance hierarchy through aggressive interactions those in large groups adopt a low-aggression (tolerant) social strategy. To test this hypothesis, we examined the effect of group size on the ontogeny of aggressive behaviour...

Author(s)
Estevez, I.; Keeling, L. J.; Newberry, R. C.
Publisher
Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam, Netherlands
Citation
Applied Animal Behaviour Science, 2003, 84, 3, pp 213-218
Abstract

When thwarted in a behaviour, laying hens show an increase in stereotyped pacing, displacement preening and a specific vocalization known as the gakel-call. How these behaviours, which might serve as indicators of welfare, are influenced by social factors is not yet known. In this study, the effect ...

Author(s)
Zimmerman, P. H.; Lundberg, A.; Keeling, L. J.; Koene, P.
Publisher
Universities Federation for Animal Welfare (UFAW), Wheathampstead, UK
Citation
Animal Welfare, 2003, 12, 3, pp 315-326
Abstract

We chose to study dust bathing behaviour in laying hens, since it is often assumed that this behaviour is socially facilitated, but it has not been tested. In addition, we investigated the effect of social rank, since this is known to be important in other aspects of hen social behaviour. Twelve...

Author(s)
Lundberg, A. S.; Keeling, L. J.
Publisher
Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam, Netherlands
Citation
Applied Animal Behaviour Science, 2003, 81, 1, pp 43-57
Abstract

Laying hens were reared from 1 day of age in 4 replicates each of 4 different group sizes: 15, 30, 60 and 120 birds. To maintain stocking density at a constant 5 birds/m2, they were housed in litter floor pens of 3, 6, 12 and 24 m2, respectively. The allocation of feeder space, drinker nipples and...

Author(s)
Keeling, L. J.; Estevez, I.; Newberry, R. C.; Correia, M. G.
Publisher
Poultry Science Association, Savoy, USA
Citation
Poultry Science, 2003, 82, 9, pp 1393-1396
Abstract

Hens in a group usually synchronize dust bathing, such that when one hen starts to dust bathe she will often be joined by others. The sight of another hen dust bathing could thus possibly act as a stimulus increasing motivation for dust bathing, with important implications for hens in furnished...

Author(s)
Olsson, I. A. S.; Duncan, I. J. H.; Keeling, L. J.; Widowski, T. M.
Publisher
Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam, Netherlands
Citation
Applied Animal Behaviour Science, 2002, 79, 4, pp 285-297
Abstract

Abnormal behaviours, such as feather pecking, can become an even greater problem if they spread through the flock. Domestic hens are a social species and it has been suggested that feather pecking behaviour can be socially transmitted from few feather pecking individuals to many. The purpose of...

Author(s)
McAdie, T. M.; Keeling, L. J.
Publisher
Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam, Netherlands
Citation
Applied Animal Behaviour Science, 2002, 75, 2, pp 147-159
Abstract

The aim of this experiment was to study the relationship between feather pecking and ground pecking in laying hens and the effect of group size on feather pecking behaviour. 900 Hisex White hens were kept in floor pens in group sizes of 15, 30, 60 and 120 birds, each with four replicates....

Author(s)
Bilčík, B.; Keeling, L. J.
Citation
Applied Animal Behaviour Science, 2000, 68, 1, pp 55-66
Abstract

The effects of competition and disturbances on nest-site selection were studied in commercial laying hens. Hens were housed in 16-litter floor pens (15, 30, 60 and 120 hens per group × 4 replicates) and the levels of aggression and disturbances were compared between nest boxes and pen corners. The...

Author(s)
Lundberg, A.; Keeling, L. J.
Citation
Applied Animal Behaviour Science, 1999, 64, 1, pp 57-69