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Abstract

Earlier research indicates that stallions may supress interactions of their harem members, leading to less stable hierarchies and friendship bonds in harems compared to non-stallion groups. In this paper, the effect of the presense of a stallion on the social behaviour of mares was studied by...

Author(s)
Granquist, S. M.; Thorhallsdottir, A. G.; Sigurjonsd, H.
Publisher
Elsevier Ltd, Oxford, UK
Citation
Applied Animal Behaviour Science, 2012, 141, 1/2, pp 49-56
Abstract

Many horse owners tend to group horses according to gender, in an attempt to reduce aggressive interactions and the risk of injuries. The aim of our experiment was to test the effects of such gender separation on injuries, social interactions and individual distance in domestic horses. A total of...

Author(s)
Jørgensen, G. H. M.; Borsheim, L.; Mejdell, C. M.; Søndergaard, E.; Bøe, K. E.
Publisher
Elsevier, Amsterdam, Netherlands
Citation
Applied Animal Behaviour Science, 2009, 120, 1/2, pp 94-99
Abstract

Social dynamics and maintenance of social cohesion were studied by analysing social interventions in two groups of horses consisting of adult mares, their offspring, adult geldings and sub-adults. The animals were observed for a total of 1316 h. All relevant dyadic and triadic social interactions,...

Author(s)
VanDierendonck, M. C.; Vries, H. de; Schilder, M. B. H.; Colenbrander, B.; Þorhallsdóttir, A. G.; Sigurjónsdóttir, H.
Publisher
Elsevier, Amsterdam, Netherlands
Citation
Applied Animal Behaviour Science, 2009, 116, 1, pp 67-73
Abstract

Managers concerned with shrinking habitats and limited resources for wildlife seek effective tools for limiting population growth in some species. Fertility control is one such tool, yet little is known about its impacts on the behavioral ecology of wild, free-roaming animals. We investigated...

Author(s)
Ransom, J. I.; Cade, B. S.; Hobbs, N. T.
Publisher
Elsevier Ltd, Oxford, UK
Citation
Applied Animal Behaviour Science, 2010, 124, 1/2, pp 51-60