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Abstract

Honeybees are well known for their complex division of labor. Each bee sequentially performs a series of social tasks during its life. The changes in social task performance are linked to gross differences in behavior and physiology. We tested whether honeybees performing different social tasks...

Author(s)
Scheiner, R.; Reim, T.; Søvik, E.; Entler, B. V.; Barron, A. B.; Thamm, M.
Publisher
Company of Biologists Ltd, Cambridge, UK
Citation
Journal of Experimental Biology, 2017, 220, 8, pp 1443-1450
Abstract

Parasites can manipulate host behaviour to increase their own transmission and fitness, but the genomic mechanisms by which parasites manipulate hosts are not well understood. We investigated the relationship between the social paper wasp, Polistes dominula, and its parasite, Xenos vesparum...

Author(s)
Geffre, A. C.; Liu RuoLin; Manfredini, F.; Beani, L.; Kathirithamby, J.; Grozinger, C. M.; Toth, A. L.
Publisher
Royal Society, London, UK
Citation
Proceedings of the Royal Society B. Biological Sciences, 2017, 284, 1852, pp 20170029
Abstract

Division of labor is a hallmark of social insects. In honey bees, division of labor involves transition of female workers from one task to the next. The most distinct tasks are nursing (providing food for the brood) and foraging (collecting pollen and nectar). The brain mechanisms regulating this...

Author(s)
Thamm, M.; Scheiner, R.
Publisher
Wiley-Blackwell, Hoboken, USA
Citation
Journal of Comparative Neurology, 2014, 522, 8, pp 1786-1799
Abstract

Behavior is among the most dynamic animal phenotypes, modulated by a variety of internal and external stimuli. Behavioral differences are associated with large-scale changes in gene expression, but little is known about how these changes are regulated. Here we show how a transcription factor (TF), ...

Author(s)
Ament, S. A.; Wang, Y.; Chen, C. C.; Blatti, C. A.; Hong, F.; Liang, Z. Z. S.; Negre, N.; White, K. P.; Rodriguez-Zas, S. L.; Mizzen, C. A.; Sinha, S.; Zhong, S.; Robinson, G. E.
Publisher
Public Library of Sciences (PLoS), San Francisco, USA
Citation
PLoS Genetics, 2012, 8, 3, pp e1002596
Abstract

Deeply conserved molecular mechanisms regulate food-searching behaviour in response to nutritional cues in a wide variety of vertebrates and invertebrates. Studies of the highly eusocial honey bee have shown that nutritional physiology and some conserved nutrient signalling pathways, especially the ...

Author(s)
Daugherty, T. H. F.; Toth, A. L.; Robinson, G. E.
Publisher
Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford, UK
Citation
Molecular Ecology, 2011, 20, 24, pp 5337-5347
Abstract

Background: Exclusion from a social group is an effective way to avoid parasite transmission. This type of social removal has also been proposed as a form of collective defense, or social immunity, in eusocial insect groups. If parasitic modification of host behavior is widespread in social...

Author(s)
McDonnell, C. M.; Alaux, C.; Parrinello, H.; Desvignes, J. P.; Crauser, D.; Durbesson, E.; Beslay, D.; Conte, Y. le
Publisher
BioMed Central Ltd, London, UK
Citation
BMC Ecology, 2013, 13, 25, pp (17 July 2013)
Abstract

Comparative sociogenomics has the potential to provide important insights into how social behaviour evolved. We examined brain gene expression profiles of the primitively eusocial wasp Polistes metricus and compared the results with a growing base of brain gene expression information for the...

Author(s)
Toth, A. L.; Varala, K.; Henshaw, M. T.; Rodriguez-Zas, S. L.; Hudson, M. E.; Robinson, G. E.
Publisher
Royal Society, London, UK
Citation
Proceedings of the Royal Society B. Biological Sciences, 2010, 277, 1691, pp 2139-2148
Abstract

To elucidate the molecular mechanisms underlying honeybee social behaviours, we identified a novel gene, Nb-1, whose expression in the worker brain changes according to the age-dependent division of labour in normal colonies. The open reading frames contained in the Nb-1 cDNA were not conserved in...

Author(s)
Tadano, H.; Yamazaki, Y.; Takeuchi, H.; Kubo, T.
Publisher
Blackwell Publishing, Oxford, UK
Citation
Insect Molecular Biology, 2009, 18, 6, pp 715-726
Abstract

Honey bees (Apis mellifera) undergo an age-related, socially regulated transition from working in the hive to foraging, which is associated with changes in the expression of thousands of genes in the brain. To begin to study the cis-regulatory code underlying this massive social regulation of gene...

Author(s)
Sinha, S.; Ling, X.; Whitfield, C. W.; Zhai, C. X.; Robinson, G. E.
Publisher
National Academy of Sciences, Washington, USA
Citation
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, 2006, 103, 44, pp 16352-16357
Abstract

Here we report the genome sequence of the honeybee Apis mellifera, a key model for social behaviour and essential to global ecology through pollination. Compared with other sequenced insect genomes, the A. mellifera genome has high A+T and CpG contents, lacks major transposon families, evolves more ...

Publisher
Nature Publishing Group, London, UK
Citation
Nature (London), 2006, 443, 7114, pp 931-949

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