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Abstract

Play is sometimes considered as an indicator of positive animal welfare. However, it is not yet sufficiently understood whether or not social play among adults can be considered as such an indicator because it is rare in adult animals. This study investigates the factors that influence social play...

Author(s)
Yamanashi, Y.; Nogami, E.; Teramoto, M.; Morimura, N.; Hirata, S.
Publisher
Elsevier, Amsterdam, Netherlands
Citation
Applied Animal Behaviour Science, 2018, 199, pp 75-83
Abstract

The great increase in the study of dog cognition in the current century has yielded insights into canine cognition in a variety of domains. In this review, we seek to place our enhanced understanding of canine cognition into context. We argue that in order to assess dog cognition, we need to regard ...

Author(s)
Lea, S. E. G.; Osthaus, B.
Publisher
Springer, New York, USA
Citation
Learning & Behavior, 2018, 46, 4, pp 335-363
Abstract

Understanding how social relationships affect long-term stress is important because stress has a profound impact on the welfare of animals and social relationships often exert a strong influence on their stress responses. The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between social...

Author(s)
Yamanashi, Y.; Teramoto, M.; Morimura, N.; Nogami, E.; Hirata, S.
Publisher
Springer-Japan, Tokyo, Japan
Citation
Primates, 2018, 59, 2, pp 145-152
Abstract

Wild chimpanzees possess various behavioral skills that allow them to respond flexibly and so adapt to complex environments. However, we lack quantitative data on the number of captive chimpanzees housed in zoos within Japan, with such behavioral skills. In this study, we conducted a survey of...

Author(s)
Yamanashi, Y.
Publisher
Japanese Association of Zoos and Aquariums, Tokyo, Japan
Citation
Journal of Japanese Association of Zoos and Aquariums, 2018, 60, 2, pp 36-52
Abstract

New World primates Sapajus sp. unexpectedly display cognitive aspects, tool use, social behavior, memory and anatomical aspects similar to Old World primates, such as chimpanzees and baboons. Convergent evolutionary aspects must have occurred between Sapajus and Old World primates and should be...

Author(s)
Soares, N. P.; Vieira, V. de S.; Pereira, D. K. S.; Lima, F. C.; Araújo, E. G.; Pereira, K. F.
Publisher
Colégio Brasileiro de Patologia Animal, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil
Citation
Pesquisa Veterinária Brasileira, 2016, 36, 11, pp 1127-1131
Abstract

Many chimpanzees throughout the world are housed in captivity, and there is an increasing effort to recreate social groups by mixing individuals with captive origins with those with wild origins. Captive origins may entail restricted rearing conditions during early infant life, including, for...

Author(s)
Levé, M.; Sueur, C.; Petit, O.; Matsuzawa, T.; Hirata, S.
Publisher
Springer-Japan, Tokyo, Japan
Citation
Primates, 2016, 57, 1, pp 73-82
Abstract

Author(s)
Hiraga, M.; Ogawa, N.; Tomioka, Y.; Ogura, N.; Kobayashi, K.; Watanabe, S.; Saito, N.; Morimura, N.
Publisher
Japanese Association of Zoos and Aquariums, Tokyo, Japan
Citation
Journal of Japanese Association of Zoos and Aquariums, 2015, 55, 4, pp 95-103
Abstract

It is widely accepted that an animal's early history, including but not limited to its rearing history, can have a profound impact on later behavior. In the case of captive animals, many studies have used categorical measures such as mother reared or human reared that do not account for both the...

Author(s)
Freeman, H. D.; Ross, S. R.
Publisher
PeerJ, San Francisco, USA
Citation
PeerJ, 2014, 2, 579, pp e579
Abstract

Researchers have described apparently self-medicative behaviors for a variety of nonhuman species including birds and primates. Wild chimpanzees, bonobos, and gorillas have been observed to swallow rough leaves without chewing, a behavior proposed to be self-medicative and to aid control of...

Author(s)
Menzel, C.; Fowler, A.; Tennie, C.; Call, J.
Publisher
Springer, New York, USA
Citation
International Journal of Primatology, 2013, 34, 3, pp 533-553
Abstract

All the great ape species are known tool users in both the wild and captivity, although there is great variation in ability and behavioral repertoire. Differences in tool use acquisition between chimpanzees and gorillas have been attributed to differing levels of social tolerance as a result of...

Author(s)
Boose, K. J.; White, F. J.; Meinelt, A.
Publisher
Wiley-Blackwell, Hoboken, USA
Citation
American Journal of Primatology, 2013, 75, 9, pp 917-926

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