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Animal Science Database

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Abstract

African wild dogs (Lycaon pictus) are endangered carnivores with a population size that is currently estimated at 6,600 adults in the wild. The European Endangered Species Program (EEP) for African wild dogs aims to maintain a healthy zoo population that is sustainable in the long term and thereby...

Author(s)
Zijlmans, D. G. M.; Duchateau, M. J. H. M.
Publisher
European Association of Zoos and Aquaria (EAZA), Amsterdam, Netherlands
Citation
Journal of Zoo and Aquarium Research, 2019, 7, 1, pp 25-30
Abstract

Cognitive testing of primates in zoos is becoming increasingly common. Cognition experiments are generally thought to be beneficial as they provide participants with an opportunity to engage in species-specific cognitive functioning, perhaps more so than with traditional forms of environmental...

Author(s)
Leeds, A.; Lukas, K. E.
Publisher
Wiley, Hoboken, USA
Citation
Zoo Biology, 2019, 38, 4, pp 397-402
Abstract

The effect that visitors have on the behavior and welfare of animals is a widely-studied topic in zoo animal welfare. Typically, these studies focus on how the presence or activity levels of visitors affect animals. However, for many species, and particularly primates, social factors, such as...

Author(s)
Woods, J. M.; Ross, S. R.; Cronin, K. A.
Publisher
MDPI AG, Basel, Switzerland
Citation
Animals, 2019, 9, 6, pp 316
Abstract

The process of chopping food for zoo animals is common in many zoos, but few studies have evaluated the benefits. While the perceived benefits of chopped diets include reduced food aggression, it is acknowledged that chopping food is time consuming for keepers and increases the risk of desiccation...

Author(s)
Shora, J. A.; Myhill, M. N. G.; Brereton, J. E.
Publisher
European Association of Zoos and Aquaria (EAZA), Amsterdam, Netherlands
Citation
Journal of Zoo and Aquarium Research, 2018, 6, 1, pp 22-25
Abstract

Ensuring welfare in captive wild animal populations is important not only for ethical and legal reasons, but also to maintain healthy individuals and populations. An increased level of social behaviors such as aggression can reduce welfare by causing physical damage and chronic stress to animals....

Author(s)
Salas, M.; Temple, D.; Abáigar, T.; Cuadrado, M.; Delclaux, M.; Enseñat, C.; Almagro, V.; Martínez-Nevado, E.; Quevedo, M. Á.; Carbajal, A.; Tallo-Parra, O.; Sabés-Alsina, M.; Amat, M.; Lopez-Bejar, M.; Fernández-Bellon, H.; Manteca, X.
Publisher
Wiley-Blackwell, Hoboken, USA
Citation
Zoo Biology, 2016, 35, 6, pp 467-473
Abstract

The formation and modification of social groups in captivity are delicate management tasks. The ability for personnel to anticipate changes in group dynamics following compositional changes can increase the likelihood of successful management with minimized injury or social instability. Hamadryas...

Author(s)
Ryan, A. M.; Hauber, M. E.
Publisher
Wiley-Blackwell, Hoboken, USA
Citation
Zoo Biology, 2016, 35, 2, pp 137-146
Abstract

The kiwi, indigenous to New Zealand, is a small flightless bird that is unique in the avian world. Detailed studies in kiwi behaviour are limited because of the nocturnal nature of the species. In this study, two juvenile Brown kiwi Apteryx mantelli chicks were monitored using a video camera for...

Author(s)
Wesley, K. B.; Brader, K.
Publisher
Wiley-Blackwell, Chichester, UK
Citation
International Zoo Yearbook, 2014, 48, 1, pp 128-138
Abstract

The long-term management of male gorillas in zoos is a significant challenge. The demographics of the population - specifically a 50/50 sex ratio and the desire to form breeding groups that contain a single male and multiple females - necessitates housing a majority of adult males outside of...

Author(s)
Stoinski, T. S.; Lukas, K. E.; Kuhar, C. W.
Publisher
Elsevier, Amsterdam, Netherlands
Citation
Applied Animal Behaviour Science, 2013, 147, 3/4, pp 316-323
Abstract

Mixed-species exhibits offer a variety of benefits but can be challenging to maintain due to difficulty in managing interspecific interactions. This is particularly true when little has been documented on the behavior of the species being mixed. This was the case when we attempted to house three...

Author(s)
Valuska, A. J.; Leighty, K. A.; Ferrie, G. M.; Nichols, V. D.; Tybor, C. L.; Plassé, C.; Bettinger, T. L.
Publisher
Wiley-Blackwell, Hoboken, USA
Citation
Zoo Biology, 2013, 32, 2, pp 216-221
Abstract

Cheetahs are known to reproduce poorly in captivity and research suggests that the reasons for this are behavioral, rather than physiological. In the wild, male cheetahs remain in stable groups, or coalitions, throughout their lifetime. Appropriate social group housing is important in enhancing...

Author(s)
Chadwick, C. L.; Rees, P. A.; Stevens-Wood, B.
Publisher
Wiley-Blackwell, Hoboken, USA
Citation
Zoo Biology, 2013, 32, 5, pp 518-527

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