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Abstract

We marvel at the social complexity of insects, marked by anatomically and behaviorally distinguishable castes, division of labor and specialization - but how do such systems evolve? Insect societies are composed of individuals, each undergoing its own developmental process and each containing its...

Author(s)
Page, R. E., Jr.; Amdam, G. V.
Publisher
John Wiley and Sons, Inc, New York, USA
Citation
BioEssays, 2007, 29, 4, pp 334-343
Abstract

Artificial colonies of C. okinawana were set up in cages using related bees ('kin' colonies) or unrelated bees ('non-kin' colonies). In all colonies, one female was queen-like, undertaking guarding behaviour and acting as the primary egg-layer. Other, worker-like, females acted as foragers and were ...

Author(s)
Sakagami, S. F.; Maeta, Y.
Citation
Japanese Journal of Entomology, 1995, 63, 1, pp 115-150
Abstract

Observations were made on 6 P. remota colonies housed in wooden boxes and kept inside the laboratory, with free access to the outside. The results showed that brood production is seasonal (there is no brood in the colony in colder months), and adult workers occur as summer and winter bees. The...

Author(s)
Benthem, F. D. J. van; Imperatriz-Fonseca, V. L.; Velthuis, H. H. W.
Citation
Insectes Sociaux, 1995, 42, 1, pp 71-87
Abstract

E. bicolor is a univoltine allodapine bee common in montane forests of southern Australia, where it exhibits a semisocial/quasisocial colony organization. Within-nest behaviour in post-emergence autumn nests of E. bicolor was recorded with the aim of studying behavioural specialization in...

Author(s)
Melna, P. A.; Schwarz, M. P.
Citation
Insectes Sociaux, 1994, 41, 1, pp 1-18
Abstract

This is a critique of a model of temporal polyethism (TP) put forward by Tofts [Bulletin of Mathematical Biology (1993) 55: 891-918] and Tofts & Franks [Trends in Ecology & Evolution (1992) 10: 346-349] for ants and bees. This 'foraging-for-work' model provides a simple explanation of TP...

Author(s)
Robinson, G. E.; Page, R. E., Jr.; Huang, Z.-Y.
Citation
Animal Behaviour, 1994, 48, 2, pp 467-469
Abstract

This review, with 56 references, first describes the diverse social organizations of sweat bees (subfamily Halictinae). Some case histories of multiple-foundress associations are described, including new data, and the phylogenetic position of the various types of associations are examined. From the ...

Author(s)
Packer, L.
Publisher
Oxford University Press, Oxford, UK
Citation
Queen number and sociality in insects., 1993, pp 215-233
Abstract

L. fratellum, a halictine bee species of the so-called 'carinate'-Evylaeus group, is mainly distributed in boreo-montane regions of the western Palearctic. In NW Germany it often inhabits disturbed high moors with great populations. In this marginal environment L. fratellum and other (halictine)...

Author(s)
Heide, A. von der
Citation
Drosera, 1992, 92, 2, pp 171-188
Abstract

When setting out a framework for the exploration of a subject, it is necessary to define terms to represent specific concepts, and to refine them as knowledge of the subject grows. It is a great advantage if stipulative definitions are also operational definitions, since this makes methods of...

Author(s)
Villet, M. H.
Citation
South African Journal of Zoology, 1991, 26, 4, pp 182-187

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