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Abstract

Sexual dimorphism in body size, aggression, and dispersal patterns may affect the degree to which males and females perceive aggression from either sex as stressful. Whereas male macaques typically disperse to new groups at maturity, thus encountering many unfamiliar individuals of both sexes,...

Author(s)
Linden, J. B.; McCowan, B.; Capitanio, J. P.; Isbell, L. A.
Publisher
Springer-Japan, Tokyo, Japan
Citation
Primates, 2019, 60, 1, pp 51-62
Abstract

Social housing of rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta) is considered to be the cornerstone of behavioral management programs in biomedical facilities. However, it also involves the risk of socially inflicted trauma. The ability to avoid such trauma would contribute to the animals' well-being and...

Author(s)
Pomerantz, O.; Baker, K. C.
Publisher
Wiley, Hoboken, USA
Citation
American Journal of Primatology, 2017, 79, 8, pp e22671
Abstract

Here we describe a case of pseudopregnancy in a New Zealand White rabbit as a result of pair housing with an aggressive conspecific. Clinical signs included fur pulling and nest building that developed shortly after separation from the aggressor. An ovariohysterectomy was performed, and...

Author(s)
Carter, C. L.; Adams, J. K.; Czarra, J. A.; Coan, P. N.
Publisher
American Association for Laboratory Animal Science, Memphis, USA
Citation
Journal of the American Association for Laboratory Animal Science, 2016, 55, 1, pp 98-99
Abstract

Agonistic behavior in group-housed male mice is a recurring problem in many animal research facilities. Common management procedures, such as the removal of aggressors, are moderately successful but often fail, owing to recurrence of aggressive behavior among cagemates. Studies have incorporated...

Author(s)
Lockworth, C. R.; Kim SunJin; Liu Jun; Palla, S. L.; Craig, S. L.
Publisher
American Association for Laboratory Animal Science, Memphis, USA
Citation
Journal of the American Association for Laboratory Animal Science, 2015, 54, 6, pp 731-736
Abstract

There are some predictable patterns of trauma in captive rhesus macaque (Macaca mulatta) social groups. Several factors have been documented to contribute to these patterns, including group formation of unrelated animals, and the establishment of dominance ranks. Here, we report on how socially...

Author(s)
Stavisky, R. C.; Ramsey, J. K.; Meeker, T.; Stovall, M.; Crane, M. M.
Publisher
Wiley, Hoboken, USA
Citation
American Journal of Primatology, 2018, 80, 3, pp e22742
Abstract

Previous studies of nonhuman primates have found relationships between health and individual differences in personality, behavior, and social status. However, despite knowing these factors are intercorrelated, many studies focus only on a single measure, for example, rank. Consequently, it is...

Author(s)
Robinson, L. M.; Coleman, K.; Capitanio, J. P.; Gottlieb, D. H.; Handel, I. G.; Adams, M. J.; Leach, M. C.; Waran, N. K.; Weiss, A.
Publisher
Wiley, Hoboken, USA
Citation
American Journal of Primatology, 2018, 80, 2, pp e22739
Abstract

We report on the permanent retirement of chimpanzees from biomedical research and on resocialization after long-term social isolation. Our aim was to investigate to what extent behavioral and endocrine measures of stress in deprived laboratory chimpanzees can be improved by a more species-typical...

Author(s)
Reimers, M.; Schwarzenberger, F.; Preuschoft, S.
Publisher
Academic Press, London, UK
Citation
Hormones and Behavior, 2007, 51, 3, pp 428-435
Abstract

To investigate differences in behaviour associated with social rank and environmental conditions, a comparison was made between swimming and feeding activities of dominant and subordinate angelfish, housed in groups of six, with those of angelfish housed singly in identical laboratory aquaria....

Author(s)
Gómez-Laplaza, L. M.; Morgan, E.
Publisher
Royal Society of Medicine Press Ltd, London, UK
Citation
Laboratory Animals, 2003, 37, 2, pp 108-120
Abstract

Study of a group of 10 female cats under laboratory conditions showed that those more socially dominant showed more offensive threats, were involved in more bouts of social licking (and fewer bouts of social sniffing), spent more time on the floor than in the compartments, and gained more weight...

Author(s)
Bos, R. van den; Buning, T. de C.
Citation
Ethology, 1994, 98, 1, pp 14-37

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