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Abstract

Owing to their naturally aggressive behaviour, male mice are often housed individually in toxicity studies. However, several publications advocate group-housing of mice to enable normal social behaviour and interactions between the animals. This refinement project aimed at facilitate group-housing...

Author(s)
Annas, A.; Bengtsson, C.; Törnqvist, E.
Publisher
Royal Society of Medicine Press Limited, London, UK
Citation
Laboratory Animals, 2013, 47, 2, pp 127-129
Abstract

Mixed-species exhibits offer a variety of benefits but can be challenging to maintain due to difficulty in managing interspecific interactions. This is particularly true when little has been documented on the behavior of the species being mixed. This was the case when we attempted to house three...

Author(s)
Valuska, A. J.; Leighty, K. A.; Ferrie, G. M.; Nichols, V. D.; Tybor, C. L.; Plassé, C.; Bettinger, T. L.
Publisher
Wiley-Blackwell, Hoboken, USA
Citation
Zoo Biology, 2013, 32, 2, pp 216-221
Abstract

Cheetahs are known to reproduce poorly in captivity and research suggests that the reasons for this are behavioral, rather than physiological. In the wild, male cheetahs remain in stable groups, or coalitions, throughout their lifetime. Appropriate social group housing is important in enhancing...

Author(s)
Chadwick, C. L.; Rees, P. A.; Stevens-Wood, B.
Publisher
Wiley-Blackwell, Hoboken, USA
Citation
Zoo Biology, 2013, 32, 5, pp 518-527
Abstract

Domestic horses are faced with social challenges throughout their lives due to limitations in social contact, space restrictions and frequent changes in social companionship. This is in contrast to natural conditions where horses live in relatively stable harem bands. Currently, little is known...

Author(s)
Christensen, J. W.; Søndergaard, E.; Thodberg, K.; Halekoh, U.
Publisher
Elsevier Ltd, Oxford, UK
Citation
Applied Animal Behaviour Science, 2011, 133, 3/4, pp 199-206
CABI Book Chapter Info
Cover for Social conditions.

In this chapter we describe how the constrained structure of managed social groups may lead to the occurrence of animal welfare problems and discuss potential solutions. Solving socially induced welfare problems is particularly challenging because it is usually more difficult to predict how animals ...

Author(s)
Galindo, F.; Newberry, R. C.; Mendl, M.
ISBN
2011 CABI (H ISBN 9781845936594)
Type
Book chapter
Abstract

Little is known about how socially housed captive carnivores respond to temporary reductions in available space. We documented rates of aggression and affiliation in our group of six female tigers, under their normal housing conditions and during a period of exhibit renovations which resulted in a...

Author(s)
Miller, A.; Leighty, K. A.; Maloney, M. A.; Kuhar, C. W.; Bettinger, T. L.
Publisher
Wiley-Blackwell, Hoboken, USA
Citation
Zoo Biology, 2011, 30, 5, pp 479-486
Abstract

Two alternative rat cages and their effect on home cage physical and social activity were evaluated in male Sprague Dawley (SPD) and Spontaneously Hypertensive (SH) rats for 10 weeks. Rats were housed strainwise in pairs in ST cages, in groups of eight in Enriched Rat Cage System (ERC) equipped...

Author(s)
Spangenberg, E.; Remes, C.; Mikkelsen, L. F.; Cvek, K.
Publisher
Scandinavian Society for Laboratory Animal Science, Stockholm, Sweden
Citation
Scandinavian Journal of Laboratory Animal Science, 2011, 38, 1, pp 47-66
Abstract

Social interactions among individuals are common both in plants and animals. With social interactions, the trait value of an individual may be influenced by the genes of its interacting partners, a phenomenon known as indirect genetic effects (IGE). An IGE is heritable effect of an individual on...

Author(s)
Alemu, S. W.
Publisher
Wageningen University, Wageningen, Netherlands
Citation
Indirect genetic effects in group-housed animals, 2015, pp 228 pp.
Abstract

Group housing is often assumed to improve the welfare of gregarious species. Whether this is actually the case depends on the advantages (e.g. more opportunity for social and locomotor behaviour) and disadvantages (e.g. increased fighting and wounding) induced by the specific housing type. We...

Author(s)
Buijs, S.; Maertens, L.; Hermans, K.; Vangeyte, J.; Tuyttens, F. A. M.
Publisher
Elsevier, Amsterdam, Netherlands
Citation
Applied Animal Behaviour Science, 2015, 172, pp 44-51
Abstract

Many horse owners tend to group horses according to gender, in an attempt to reduce aggressive interactions and the risk of injuries. The aim of our experiment was to test the effects of such gender separation on injuries, social interactions and individual distance in domestic horses. A total of...

Author(s)
Jørgensen, G. H. M.; Borsheim, L.; Mejdell, C. M.; Søndergaard, E.; Bøe, K. E.
Publisher
Elsevier, Amsterdam, Netherlands
Citation
Applied Animal Behaviour Science, 2009, 120, 1/2, pp 94-99

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