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Animal Science Database

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Abstract

Social housing of rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta) is considered to be the cornerstone of behavioral management programs in biomedical facilities. However, it also involves the risk of socially inflicted trauma. The ability to avoid such trauma would contribute to the animals' well-being and...

Author(s)
Pomerantz, O.; Baker, K. C.
Publisher
Wiley, Hoboken, USA
Citation
American Journal of Primatology, 2017, 79, 8, pp e22671
Abstract

Group housing is becoming the standard for many farm animal species, as it is seen as a more welfare friendly way of keeping gregarious animals. Aggression between female breeding rabbits currently obstructs the implementation of group housing for this species. Lack of social experience during the...

Author(s)
Buijs, S.; Vangeyte, J.; Tuyttens, F. A. M.
Publisher
Elsevier, Amsterdam, Netherlands
Citation
Applied Animal Behaviour Science, 2016, 182, pp 53-60
Abstract

Agonistic behavior in group-housed male mice is a recurring problem in many animal research facilities. Common management procedures, such as the removal of aggressors, are moderately successful but often fail, owing to recurrence of aggressive behavior among cagemates. Studies have incorporated...

Author(s)
Lockworth, C. R.; Kim SunJin; Liu Jun; Palla, S. L.; Craig, S. L.
Publisher
American Association for Laboratory Animal Science, Memphis, USA
Citation
Journal of the American Association for Laboratory Animal Science, 2015, 54, 6, pp 731-736
Abstract

Group housing is often assumed to improve the welfare of gregarious species. Whether this is actually the case depends on the advantages (e.g. more opportunity for social and locomotor behaviour) and disadvantages (e.g. increased fighting and wounding) induced by the specific housing type. We...

Author(s)
Buijs, S.; Maertens, L.; Hermans, K.; Vangeyte, J.; Tuyttens, F. A. M.
Publisher
Elsevier, Amsterdam, Netherlands
Citation
Applied Animal Behaviour Science, 2015, 172, pp 44-51
Abstract

In nature, the way essential resources are distributed is recognized as a potentially important factor influencing the frequency of aggressive interactions between animals. This knowledge is rarely taken into consideration when designing housing environments for social groups of farm animals. Adult ...

Author(s)
Akre, A. K.; Hovland, A. L.; Bakken, M.
Publisher
Elsevier Ltd, Oxford, UK
Citation
Applied Animal Behaviour Science, 2010, 126, 1/2, pp 67-74
Abstract

Due to farmed foxes' (Vulpes vulpes) social flexibility and possible motivation for intraspecific contact, group housing may act as an alternative housing procedure. Because initial social contact between silver foxes usually involves agonistic displays as a part of foxes' social dominance...

Author(s)
Hovland, A. L.; Akre, A. K.; Bakken, M.
Publisher
Elsevier Ltd, Oxford, UK
Citation
Applied Animal Behaviour Science, 2010, 126, 3/4, pp 154-162
Abstract

Author(s)
Arnold, C. E.; Estep, D. Q.
Citation
Applied Animal Behaviour Science, 1990, 27, 3, pp 253-261

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