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Abstract

Cockroaches (Blattaria) are considered universally gregarious insects. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that even related species and/or males and females of the same species may exhibit different aggregation patterns. We compared aggregation behaviour in six cockroach species belonging to...

Author(s)
Varadínová, Z.; Stejskal, V.; Frynta, D.
Publisher
Blackwell Publishing Ltd, Oxford, UK
Citation
Entomologia Experimentalis et Applicata, 2010, 136, 2, pp 184-190
Abstract

Author(s)
Nalepa, C. A.; Bell, W. J.
Publisher
Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, UK
Citation
The evolution of social behaviour in insects and arachnids., 1997, pp 26-51
Abstract

Social signals that mediate intraspecific interactions can be complex, conveying considerable information concerning the probable behaviour of individuals and minimizing overt aggression and wasted energy. In the cockroach N. cinerea, male-male competition and female mate choice are mediated by a...

Author(s)
Moore, A. J.
Citation
Evolution, 1997, 51, 6, pp 1920-1928
Abstract

The evolution of pre-social behaviour in 2 clades of cockroaches (Blaberidae and Polyphagidae) was studied in reference to phylogeny. In each clade, both solitary and pre-social behaviours were found to exist. These behaviours were parsimoniously mapped on phylogenies obtained from previous...

Author(s)
Grandcolas, P.
Citation
Ethology, Ecology & Evolution, 1997, 9, 1, pp 69-76
Abstract

Nauphoeta cinerea male-male aggressive interactions result in dominant-subordinate relationships. Once dominance relationships are established, a male can recognize the status of another individual, probably through chemical cues. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of these male-male ...

Author(s)
Everaerts, C.; Fenaux-Benderitter, F.; Farine, J. P.; Brossut, R.
Citation
Insectes Sociaux, 1997, 44, 3, pp 277-287
Abstract

The ovoviviparous cockroach, R. erubescens, was studied in the laboratory in Gabon and Central African Republic. The nymphs aggregated for only 1.5 h under the female after the brood birth. This short-lived brooding behaviour is possibly related to the solitary life habits of this species, and is...

Author(s)
Grandcolas, P.
Publisher
Société Entomologique de France, Paris, France
Citation
Bulletin de la Société Entomologique de France, 1996, 101, 3, pp 231-234
Abstract

The influence of prior social experience on the outcome of agonistic interactions between male G. portentosa were examined. Males were placed randomly in pairs and allowed to form stable dominance-subordinance associations (original pairs). Two types of social conditions were then examined....

Author(s)
Clark, D. C.; Beshear, D. D.; Moore, A. J.
Citation
Annals of the Entomological Society of America, 1995, 88, 4, pp 554-561
Abstract

Male G. portentosa produce a variety of sounds or 'hisses' during social interactions. The agonistic signals produced during male-male competition were examined, specifically the intra- and inter-individual variation of agonistic hisses, to determine whether these sounds could be reliable...

Author(s)
Clark, D. C.; Moore, A. J.
Citation
Animal Behaviour, 1995, 50, 3, pp 719-729
Abstract

Although stable hierarchies have been documented in a wide variety of species, virtually nothing is known about what occurs when a hierarchy is disrupted, and the group is subsequently re-formed. How likely is it that the same hierarchy will re-form? This attribute, which is quantified using a...

Author(s)
Dugatkin, L. A.; Alfieri, M. S.; Moore, A. J.
Citation
Ethology, 1994, 97, 2, pp 94-102
Abstract

Agonistic interactions were studied among males of G. portentosa, in groups of 5 (low-density) or 10 (high-density) males. Consistent with previous studies of male pairs, aggression was observed (abdomen flick, abdomen push, butt, lunge), submission (crouch retreat), and noncontact behaviour...

Author(s)
Clark, D. C.; Moore, A. J.
Citation
Journal of Insect Behavior, 1994, 7, 2, pp 199-215

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