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Abstract

The recent range expansion of human babesiosis in the northeastern United States, once found only in restricted coastal sites, is not well understood. This study sought to utilize a large number of samples to examine the population structure of the parasites on a fine scale to provide insights into ...

Author(s)
Goethert, H. K.; Molloy, P.; Berardi, V.; Weeks, K.; Telford, S. R., III
Publisher
Public Library of Sciences (PLoS), San Francisco, USA
Citation
PLoS ONE, 2018, 13, 3, pp e0193837
Abstract

Rhipicephalus microplus, better known as the Asiatic cattle tick, is a largely invasive ectoparasite of great economic importance due to the negative effect it has on agricultural livestock on a global scale, particularly cattle. Tick-borne diseases (babesiosis and anaplasmosis) transmitted by R....

Author(s)
Baron, S.; Merwe, N. A. van der; Madder, M.; Maritz-Olivier, C.
Publisher
Public Library of Sciences (PLoS), San Francisco, USA
Citation
PLoS ONE, 2015, 10, 7, pp e0131341
Abstract

Background: In December 2007, Babesia bovis was introduced to New Caledonia through the importation of cattle vaccinated with a live tick fever (babesiosis and anaplasmosis) vaccine. Medical measures, acaricide and antiprotozoal treatments, and quarantine restrictions were implemented with success...

Author(s)
Hüe, T.; Graille, M.; Mortelecque, A.; Desoutter, D.; Delathière, J. M.; Marchal, C.; Teurlai, M.; Barré, N.
Publisher
Wiley-Blackwell, Melbourne, Australia
Citation
Australian Veterinary Journal, 2013, 91, 6, pp 254-258
Abstract

A molecular epidemiological survey of the protozoal parasites that cause equine piroplasmosis was conducted using samples collected from horses and zebra from different geographical locations in South Africa. A total of 488 samples were tested for the presence of Theileria equi and/or Babesia...

Author(s)
Bhoora, R.; Franssen, L.; Oosthuizen, M. C.; Guthrie, A. J.; Zweygarth, E.; Penzhorn, B. L.; Jongejan, F.; Collins, N. E.
Publisher
Elsevier, Amsterdam, Netherlands
Citation
Veterinary Parasitology, 2009, 159, 2, pp 112-120
Abstract

Progress in disease control and animal husbandry during the last 25 years is briefly reviewed. Tuberculosis was controlled by a wider use of diagnostic methods and slaughter of affected animals; satisfactory results are reported for the short thermal tuberculin test as a supplementary test in...

Author(s)
BULL, L. B.
Citation
Empire Journal of Experimental Agriculture, 1958, 26, pp 92-103
Abstract

In a paper which appeared in the Annales of the Pasteur Institute in 1924, the authors published the results of their first systematic investigations of the bovine piroplasmoses occurring in Algeria. The conclusion arrived at was that five types of disease occur, namely: -
(1) True piroplasmosis...

Author(s)
SERGENT, Edm. ; DONATIEN, A; PARROT, L. ; LESTOQUARD, F. ; PLANTUREUX, E.
Citation
Ann. Inst. Pasteur, 1927, 41, 7, pp 721-784 pp.
Abstract

Equine piroplasmosis is set up by two distinct causal organisms, that is, the term denotes in reality two separate diseases, which can be differentiated clinically and epizootologically. A certain diagnosis can, however, only be established by a microscopic examination of the blood. Whereas N. equi ...

Author(s)
DU TOIT, P. J.
Citation
Archiv fur Schiffs- und Tropenhygiene, 1919, 23, 7, pp 121-135 pp.

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