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Abstract

The western honey bee, Apis mellifera, provides critical pollination services to agricultural crops worldwide. However, despite substantial interest and prior investigation, the early evolution and subsequent diversification of this important pollinator remain uncertain. The primary hypotheses...

Author(s)
Cridland, J. M.; Tsutsui, N. D.; Ramírez, S. R.
Publisher
Oxford University Press, Oxford, UK
Citation
Genome Biology and Evolution, 2017, 9, 2, pp 457-472
Abstract

Backgrounds: Apis mellifera scutellata and A.m. capensis (the Cape honey bee) are western honey bee subspecies indigenous to the Republic of South Africa (RSA). Both bees are important for biological and economic reasons. First, A.m. scutellata is the invasive "African honey bee" of the Americas...

Author(s)
Eimanifar, A.; Brooks, S. A.; Bustamante, T.; Ellis, J. D.
Publisher
BioMed Central Ltd, London, UK
Citation
BMC Genomics, 2018, 19, 615, pp (15 August 2018)
Abstract

With globalization the Western honey bee has become a nearly cosmopolitan species, but it was originally restricted to the Old World. This renowned model of biodiversity has diverged into five evolutionary lineages and several geographic "subspecies." If Apis mellifera unicolor is indubitably an...

Author(s)
Techer, M. A.; Clémencet, J.; Simiand, C.; Turpin, P.; Garnery, L.; Reynaud, B.; Delatte, H.
Publisher
Public Library of Sciences (PLoS), San Francisco, USA
Citation
PLoS ONE, 2017, 12, 12, pp e0189234
Abstract

We investigated honeybee populations of A. mellifera in Saharan and coastal locations in Libya to fill the North Africa gap of biogeography and distribution of honeybees, morphologically and using mtDNA analysis. It was found that Libyan honeybees are different, morphologically and genetically,...

Author(s)
Shaibi, T.
Publisher
Ain Shams University, Cairo, Egypt
Citation
Egyptian Academic Journal of Biological Sciences: Entomology, 2013, 6, 2, pp 39-47
Abstract

The native range of the honeybee Apis mellifera encompasses Europe, Africa, and the Middle East, whereas the nine other species of Apis are found exclusively in Asia. It is therefore commonly assumed that A. mellifera arose in Asia and expanded into Europe and Africa. However, other hypotheses for...

Author(s)
Han Fan; Wallberg, A.; Webster, M. T.
Publisher
Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford, UK
Citation
Ecology and Evolution, 2012, 2, 8, pp 1949-1957
Abstract

We characterized Apis mellifera in both native and introduced ranges using 1136 single-nucleotide polymorphisms genotyped in 341 individuals. Our results indicate that A. mellifera originated in Africa and expanded into Eurasia at least twice, resulting in populations in eastern and western Europe...

Author(s)
Whitfield, C. W.; Behura, S. K.; Berlocher, S. H.; Clark, A. G.; Johnston, J. S.; Sheppard, W. S.; Smith, D. R.; Suarez, A. V.; Weaver, D.; Tsutsui, N. D.
Publisher
American Association for the Advancement of Science, Washington, USA
Citation
Science (Washington), 2006, 314, 5799, pp 642-645
Abstract

Here we report the genome sequence of the honeybee Apis mellifera, a key model for social behaviour and essential to global ecology through pollination. Compared with other sequenced insect genomes, the A. mellifera genome has high A+T and CpG contents, lacks major transposon families, evolves more ...

Publisher
Nature Publishing Group, London, UK
Citation
Nature (London), 2006, 443, 7114, pp 931-949
Abstract

The concept of a suite of foraging behaviors was introduced as a set of traits showing associative directional change as a characterization of adaptive evolution. I report how naturally selected differential sucrose response thresholds directionally affected a suite of honey bee foraging behaviors. ...

Author(s)
Pankiw, T.
Publisher
Springer-Verlag, Berlin, Germany
Citation
Behavioral Ecology and Sociobiology, 2003, 54, 5, pp 458-464
Abstract

The analysis of phenotypic divergence among local populations within a species has been traditionally performed in a spatial context, although advances in genetic analysis using mtDNA have permitted a simultaneous evaluation of geographical and historical patterns of variation, so-called...

Author(s)
Diniz-Filho, J. A. F.; Fuchs, S.; Arias, M. C.
Citation
Heredity, 1999, 83, 6, pp 671-680
Abstract

Canonical trend surface analysis (CTSA) is a powerful multivariate statistical method that finds linear combinations of morphological data which have maximum correlation with geographic space. In this study, CTSA was applied to morphometric variation among 42 Africanized honey bee populations from...

Author(s)
Diniz-Filho, J. A. F.
Citation
Journal of Apicultural Research, 1995, 34, 2, pp 65-72

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