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Abstract

Objective: Conventional wisdom suggests that parasites evolve increased host specialization over time. Host specificity, which describes the number of host species parasitized, is one aspect of host specialization. Recent studies of vertebrate parasites indicate that highly host-specific parasite...

Author(s)
Johnson, K. P.; Weckstein, J. D.; Bush, S. E.; Clayton, D. H.
Publisher
Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, UK
Citation
Parasitology, 2011, 138, 13, pp 1730-1736
Abstract

Parasitic "wing lice" (Phthiraptera: Columbicola) and their dove and pigeon hosts are a well-recognized model system for coevolutionary studies at the intersection of micro- and macroevolution. Selection on lice in microevolutionary time occurs as pigeons and doves defend themselves against lice by ...

Author(s)
Boyd, B. M.; Allen, J. M.; Nam Phuong Nguyen; Sweet, A. D.; Warnow, T.; Shapiro, M. D.; Villa, S. M.; Bush, S. E.; Clayton, D. H.; Johnson, K. P.
Publisher
Oxford University Press, Oxford, UK
Citation
Systematic Biology, 2017, 66, 6, pp 896-911
Abstract

For birds, the first line of defence against ectoparasites is preening. The effectiveness of self-preening for ectoparasite control is well known. By contrast, the ectoparasite control function of allopreening - in which one birds preens another - has not been rigorously tested. We infested captive ...

Author(s)
Villa, S. M.; Goodman, G. B.; Ruff, J. S.; Clayton, D. H.
Publisher
Royal Society, London, UK
Citation
Biology Letters, 2016, 12, 7, pp 20160362
Abstract

Parasites can negatively affect the evolutionary fitness of their hosts by eliciting physiological stress responses. Parasite-induced stress can be monitored by measuring changes in the adrenal steroid hormone corticosterone. We examined the effect of an invasive parasite on the corticosterone...

Author(s)
Knutie, S. A.; Koop, J. A. H.; French, S. S.; Clayton, D. H.
Publisher
Elsevier, Amsterdam, Netherlands
Citation
General and Comparative Endocrinology, 2013, 193, pp 68-71
Abstract

Background: Many groups of insects have obligate bacterial symbionts that are vertically transmitted. Such associations are typically characterized by the presence of a monophyletic group of bacteria living in a well-defined host clade. In addition the phylogeny of the symbiotic bacteria is...

Author(s)
Smith, W. A.; Oakeson, K. F.; Johnson, K. P.; Reed, D. L.; Carter, T.; Smith, K. L.; Koga, R.; Fukatsu, T.; Clayton, D. H.; Dale, C.
Publisher
BioMed Central Ltd, London, UK
Citation
BMC Evolutionary Biology, 2013, 13, 109, pp (31 May 2013)
Abstract

Reciprocal selective effects between coevolving species are often influenced by interactions with the broader ecological community. Community-level interactions may also influence macroevolutionary patterns of coevolution, such as cospeciation, but this hypothesis has received little attention. We...

Author(s)
Harbison, C. W.; Clayton, D. H.
Publisher
National Academy of Sciences, Washington, USA
Citation
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, 2011, 108, 23, pp 9525-9529
Abstract

Ecological theory traditionally predicts that interspecific competition selects for an increase in ecological specialization. Specialization, in turn, is often thought to be an evolutionary 'dead end,' with specialist lineages unlikely to evolve into generalist lineages. In host-parasite systems,...

Author(s)
Johnson, K. P.; Malenke, J. R.; Clayton, D. H.
Publisher
Royal Society, London, UK
Citation
Proceedings of the Royal Society B. Biological Sciences, 2009, 276, 1675, pp 3921-3926
Abstract

Following an introduction, the sections of this chapter are entitled: avoiding and controlling nest-borne ectoparasites; costs of nest-borne and other ectoparasites; nest avoidance and desertion; controlling ectoparasites by secondary plant compounds; removing ectoparasites from the body and...

Author(s)
Hart, B. L.
Publisher
Oxford University Press (OUP), Oxford, UK
Citation
Host-parasite evolution: general principles and avian models., 1997, pp 59-77
Abstract

Following an introduction, the sections of this chapter are entitled: analytical methods; an example: co-speciation between seabirds and chewing lice; Brooks parsimony analysis of seabirds and lice; component analysis of seabirds and lice.

Author(s)
Paterson, A. M.; Gray, R. D.
Publisher
Oxford University Press (OUP), Oxford, UK
Citation
Host-parasite evolution: general principles and avian models., 1997, pp 236-250
Abstract

Evidence for parasite-mediated natural selection within naturally-occurring host-parasite assemblages is examined, using avian examples (helminths and protozoa) wherever possible. Requirements necessary for parasite-mediated selection are discussed (parasite numbers must vary within a host...

Author(s)
Goater, C. P.; Holmes, J. C.
Publisher
Oxford University Press (OUP), Oxford, UK
Citation
Host-parasite evolution: general principles and avian models., 1997, pp 9-29

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